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The Photography Thread

izzikio_rage

Technomancer
Awesome pics quan chi

CyberKid : welcome to the DSLR world. It's hard for the first few photoshoots but then you'll start wondering how you survived without this. Keep posting. Btw start with some low light shots or sunset shots (in raw) that will give you a clear idea of how awesome a DSLR is
 

pranav0091

I am not an Owl
Moving up to a dSLR. Posting here my regular subjects. The learning curve is far more than what I expected. I will need to learn a lot before proper dSLR level shots start coming by and the subjects change. :-D

Congrats on the purchase :)
Remember, the DSLR pics are a lot about silent behind the scene post-processing as they are about the camera. The camera produces an image thats detailed enough to be processed, and the post processing is what gives it the punch :)

That being said, there is definitely the need to get the basics of focus, exposure and framing decently well.

Directed comments:
Pic 1 : no clear subject - nothing truly in focus.
Pic 2 : Dull subject. Clutter in the form of background leaves

Both pics are hurt by the use of flash, as Sujoy already indicated.
 

CyberKID

In search for Tech Gyan!
Thanks for the honest feedback and suggestions guys.
I understand there are a lot of things to learn. Since the photographs were shot in night, with no other source of light, I had to use flash. More than that, I am still figuring a lot of things, including how to turn off flash, in case the camera decides it needs it. :p
Thanks Pranav, I realised that the first one didn't have a proper focus, as Autofocus wasn't properly focusing one particular subject. Just today, I learnt the use of the focus ring while focusing manually. Will keep posting for your feedback to help me improve.:)
 

pranav0091

I am not an Owl
Thanks for the honest feedback and suggestions guys.
I understand there are a lot of things to learn. Since the photographs were shot in night, with no other source of light, I had to use flash. More than that, I am still figuring a lot of things, including how to turn off flash, in case the camera decides it needs it. :p
Thanks Pranav, I realised that the first one didn't have a proper focus, as Autofocus wasn't properly focusing one particular subject. Just today, I learnt the use of the focus ring while focusing manually. Will keep posting for your feedback to help me improve.:)


Here is a trick that might help you with manual focus. It works on my 600D, so I'm assuming that it works on your D5200 as well.

If you listen carefully there is always a small-beep when the camera locks focus when in auto mode as you half press the shutter button. If you observe through the optical viewfinder, you'll see that all the focus-points that the camera thinks are in focus will light up red momentarily along with the beep.

Now try this - put the camera in manual-focus mode (its a switch on the lens), and move around the focus-ring while half-pressing the shutter button - you'll hear the same beep and and see the same lighting up of the points (1 point or many) in focus. Thats how you can know you are really in focus when using manual mode on really tricky subjects or small subjects where your eye cant say 100% confidently if you are in focus.

To pull it off, you'll have to move the camera such that one of the focus points in the viewfinder (those little square boxes that are scattered all over the viewfinder view) to lie over the part of the subject that you want to keep in focus.

Hope that helps :)
 

CyberKID

In search for Tech Gyan!
Here is a trick that might help you with manual focus. It works on my 600D, so I'm assuming that it works on your D5200 as well.

If you listen carefully there is always a small-beep when the camera locks focus when in auto mode as you half press the shutter button. If you observe through the optical viewfinder, you'll see that all the focus-points that the camera thinks are in focus will light up red momentarily along with the beep.

Now try this - put the camera in manual-focus mode (its a switch on the lens), and move around the focus-ring while half-pressing the shutter button - you'll hear the same beep and and see the same lighting up of the points (1 point or many) in focus. Thats how you can know you are really in focus when using manual mode on really tricky subjects or small subjects where your eye cant say 100% confidently if you are in focus.

To pull it off, you'll have to move the camera such that one of the focus points in the viewfinder (those little square boxes that are scattered all over the viewfinder view) to lie over the part of the subject that you want to keep in focus.

Hope that helps :)
Thanks for that tip, Pranav. It helps getting such helpful tips from experienced people like you. I'll try this one out and will let you know. :-D
 

quan chi

mortal kombat
Sorry sujoy but all these looks very generic.(I am being honest. Thats what I feel Please don't take any offence.:) ) Doesn't looks like you clicked them. From a person like you the expectations are a bit high.:D
 

sujoyp

Grand Master
[MENTION=15209]quan chi[/MENTION] :D I can understand

yes amlan...but my next plans are in may...a goa trip and a ladakh trip ..yey :D
 

nac

Aspiring Novelist
Mobile camera photography
First one is excellent :thumbs:
Moving up to a dSLR. Posting here my regular subjects. The learning curve is far more than what I expected. I will need to learn a lot before proper dSLR level shots start coming by and the subjects change. :-D
Same subject but now with DSLR :D
- Use flash diffuser.
- DSLR do well in low light, so don't worry about pushing ISO high.

Hoping to see some good plant and flower photography from you. :)

Some pics I shot yesterday
Colour is good in CST but something more could have been done to make it a keeper...
 

pranav0091

I am not an Owl
[MENTION=39722]sujoyp[/MENTION] : A little underwhelming coming from you :)
Get a CPL and a lens that doesnt have a rotating front element if you are going to Ladakh

[MENTION=89408]criztle[/MENTION] : The second and third pics are good, while your webpage has a few rather nice ones. Many of those pics, they can look considerably better, if you invest in a little post processing - even picasa should be sufficient. Stuff like trimming out excess, horizontal horizons and kicking up the saturation a bit - stuff like that. Post processing, I keep harping every 10 posts, can make a good pic great and a bad pic usable. Invest in it.



Visited Bannerghatta recently -bad time to visit, everything being dry, but then atleast the butterflies had a little mercy on me :)

butterfly_4_only_cropped by pranav0091, on Flickr


butterfly_5_1 by pranav0091, on Flickr


butterfly_1 by pranav0091, on Flickr


flowers_2 by pranav0091, on Flickr


butterfly_3 by pranav0091, on Flickr


birdie_1 by pranav0091, on Flickr



Album at https://www.flickr.com/photos/91328332@N07/sets/72157651630810621
 
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criztle

Advocate | Lawyer
[MENTION=119687]pranav0091[/MENTION] Thanks for the advice. I will keep in mind and the butterflies look so great!
 

pranav0091

I am not an Owl
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