Need Suggestions on creating partition on new 2TB HDD WD Red

ajayritik

Technomancer
I Recently bought a 2 TB Internal HDD from WD.
Need suggestions on the partition I need to create.
I intend to use this as the only HDD.
I'm not sure about the existing HDD's that I have so want to use the new one as the one for both OS and storing Personal files, movies etc.
What should be the primary Partition size.
Thanks in advance.
 

rhitwick

Democracy is a myth
2TB HDD...

Why not keep 200GB for primary partition, the OS (Win7/Win8/Win10) keep on consuming more space with each release, add to that occasional patches and updates. Then there are softwares that you would keep installing and would then forget to uninstall.
200GB primary partition is safe I guess.

Rest of the space you can plan for yourself I guess.


If you intend to use other HDDs along with this one, make sure you check the jumper settings so that both OS and MBR resides on same HDD.

(I've messed up this one in my system. Now my OS is installed in my 160GB Seagate HDD whereas my MBR resides on the new 500GB WD :( )
 

Vyom

The Power of x480
Staff member
Admin
Well, since I recently had to format my 1 TB internal WD HDD (since I wiped out the hdd accidently) I have leant a lot of things that I didn't know about before. Here is a comprehensive list:

1. You would like to format your HDD with GPT instead of MBR. MBR have limitation of only 4 primary partitions in Windows. So you can only create 3 primary partition and one extented partition which can then be divided into multiple logical partitions. If you want to overcome this stupid limitation (born decades ago) you should format the drive with GPT. This will allow you to make virtually any number of primary partitions. Ubuntu plays well with GPT partition, so does Windows 7. But those should be 64 bit OS. A 32 bit OS can't access GPT drives.

2. Primary partition size depends on what OS (or OSes) you want to install. For Ubuntu size can be anywhere between 50 to 100 GB (depending on your usage). For Windows 7 and later (which occupies 10 Gigs only in the installation files), partition should be minimum 100 GB. (You can store Steam games and other big files on another drives).

3. You should use GParted to partition the HDD. GParted can be created as a Live disk or Live bootable USB. Or it can be used by creating a Live Ubunutu USB.

Good luck.

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(I've messed up this one in my system. Now my OS is installed in my 160GB Seagate HDD whereas my MBR resides on the new 500GB WD :( )

Why not use EasyBCD to recreate or move MBR to any drive you want? I don't know how to but I am pretty sure it can be done.
 
OP
ajayritik

ajayritik

Technomancer
If you intend to use other HDDs along with this one, make sure you check the jumper settings so that both OS and MBR resides on same HDD.
Initially I'm planning to have only one HDD i.e. the new one connected and maybe once a month or like that connect the other old HDD and take a backup of data.
Can you please give me more details on how can I ensure that what you said is being followed. I have bolded the text for which I would need more details.
 

Vyom

The Power of x480
Staff member
Admin
I am pretty sure, Jumper settings are outdated now, in the SATA drives. It was an issue with IDE HDD's, but now with SATA, there is no such thing as Jumper settings.
 
OP
ajayritik

ajayritik

Technomancer
Well, since I recently had to format my 1 TB internal WD HDD (since I wiped out the hdd accidently) I have leant a lot of things that I didn't know about before. Here is a comprehensive list:

1. You would like to format your HDD with GPT instead of MBR. MBR have limitation of only 4 primary partitions in Windows. So you can only create 3 primary partition and one extented partition which can then be divided into multiple logical partitions. If you want to overcome this stupid limitation (born decades ago) you should format the drive with GPT. This will allow you to make virtually any number of primary partitions. Ubuntu plays well with GPT partition, so does Windows 7. But those should be 64 bit OS. A 32 bit OS can't access GPT drives.

2. Primary partition size depends on what OS (or OSes) you want to install. For Ubuntu size can be anywhere between 50 to 100 GB (depending on your usage). For Windows 7 and later (which occupies 10 Gigs only in the installation files), partition should be minimum 100 GB. (You can store Steam games and other big files on another drives).

3. You should use GParted to partition the HDD. GParted can be created as a Live disk or Live bootable USB. Or it can be used by creating a Live Ubunutu USB.
If you don't mind can you give me a link which gives more details on things like Primary Partition followed by GPT and MBR stuff.
It's been ages since I created partitions etc. Would want a quick refresher on these things.
It's because I don't want situation where after I create the partition and later regret about the number of primary partitions.
 

Vyom

The Power of x480
Staff member
Admin
Well, read this good article about MBR and GPT:
What?s the Difference Between GPT and MBR When Partitioning a Drive?
 

Lincon_WD

WD Official
Hi ajayritik,

Normally the size for primary partition depends on the programs you will install on it. In your case it should be anywhere between 150 GB to 300GB since it's 2TB HDD. You may follow the instructions on the link below:

Support Answers

Hope it helps.
 

mitraark

Siuuu
I use a 2 TB WD Green on my 2nd PC, I have a 163 GB partition and another 1700 GB partition.

I download and move around a lot of files, it's really troublesome waiting hours moving from one partiton to another. Same partition Cut Paste operations takes seconds.
 
OP
ajayritik

ajayritik

Technomancer
I use a 2 TB WD Green on my 2nd PC, I have a 163 GB partition and another 1700 GB partition.

I download and move around a lot of files, it's really troublesome waiting hours moving from one partiton to another. Same partition Cut Paste operations takes seconds.

So you are kind of saying better to have lesser partitions for faster file moves.
 

Vyom

The Power of x480
Staff member
Admin
Bigger partitions are good, for easy moving files, yes. But in case something goes wrong, with one wrong mistake a whole partition can be lost, which if the partition is a really big one, it can cause more damage at once. Hence I choose size of partition according to the kind of data that I need to keep.
So if I have a 1 TB HDD, I would choose 300 gigs just for Multimedia stuff, like Movies and Songs. 50 Gig for documents and 100 GB for Software and probably 30 GB partition to test Windows 10, etc.
 
OP
ajayritik

ajayritik

Technomancer
MBR looks easier for me though GPT seems to be better.

- - - Updated - - -

Guys I would want to get this thing done this weekend.
Should I go ahead with MBR.
If so is it ok to have the primary partition as 300 GB around as suggested by rhitwick.
 

rhitwick

Democracy is a myth
Go for whichever feels ok for you. You really don't need more than one primary partition unless you are not experimenting diff. OSes everyday.
I'll say MBR.
Don't see any real life issue with that.
300GB seems too much. I'll say 200GB should be ok for you.
 
OP
ajayritik

ajayritik

Technomancer
Go for whichever feels ok for you. You really don't need more than one primary partition unless you are not experimenting diff. OSes everyday.
I'll say MBR.
Don't see any real life issue with that.
300GB seems too much. I'll say 200GB should be ok for you.

Before I install OS I just need to do the following steps.
Ensure all old HDD's are removed and connect the new HDD
Insert the Windows OS DVD
Then do the partitioning.
Next installation of OS.
 

$hadow

Geek in making
Before I install OS I just need to do the following steps.
Ensure all old HDD's are removed and connect the new HDD
Insert the Windows OS DVD
Then do the partitioning.
Next installation of OS.

yup this is what you should follow.
 
OP
ajayritik

ajayritik

Technomancer
Thanks to rhitwick and always ready to help friend shadow!

- - - Updated - - -

Everything all set guys.
Thanks again!
 

mitraark

Siuuu
So you are kind of saying better to have lesser partitions for faster file moves.

When you move files on the same partition, they don't physically move the file contents on the disk, just changes the pointer to it, matter of seconds.

If you move files from one partition to another, files are physically moved.
 
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