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Need Suggestions for a good surge protector

techspark

Broken In
My sub-woofer got fried yesterday when i saw a bright spark from my current pinnacle surge protector. I have learnt the lesson and i now need suggestions for a new good quality surge protector. I would prefer one with individual switches but i cant find any of the good brands to have individual switches for each outlet.

Here are some important points :)

1.My budget is anything from rs 400-1000. Cheaper, better. I would prefer 6 outlet one.

2.I am getting a belkin 6 way economy for rs400, should i go for it ? Are there any models of belkin/apc with individual switches ?

3.How would you compare belkin to mx ?

4. Does the belkin surge protector have led indicators ?? I couldnt locate any leds in the images, especially of the economy series.

Looking forward to the replies. Btw, i m still running my pc on the spoilt pinnacle surge protector so i need to get a new one as soon as possible.

Thanks
 

Ishu Gupta

Manchester United
1) Belkin 8 Plug Gold is 1.3k. 6 Plug would be cheaper.
2) Belkin is good. I would recommend the Gold series over the Economic series.
4) I don't think so.
 

d3p

PowerHouse
@techspark: Belkin has some good Spike Buster or Surge Protectors.

1. Belkin 8 socket Gold with 1lakh damage coverage & lifetime warranty: Rs.1400.00
Link: Click Here

2. Belkin Superior Series 6-Socket with 50k damage Coverage & lifetime warranty : Rs 1000.00

Link: Click Here

Both are highly recommended at this budget, depend on the load & budget go for any one of them....
 

d6bmg

BMG ftw!!
@techspark: Belkin has some good Spike Buster or Surge Protectors.

1. Belkin 8 socket Gold with 1lakh damage coverage & lifetime warranty: Rs.1400.00
Link: Click Here

2. Belkin Superior Series 6-Socket with 50k damage Coverage & lifetime warranty : Rs 1000.00

Link: Click Here

Both are highly recommended at this budget, depend on the load & budget go for any one of them....

Damage coverage warranty!! Good!!
 
OP
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techspark

Broken In
I have two belkin ones at home. They are doing fine until now. The economy series I guess.

Does it have led lights to indicate such as if 'all is okay' or 'ground open' etc. like its there on other spike protectors. Please let me know , this can be a deciding factor whether i should consider belkin economy series. Thanks
 

d3p

PowerHouse
Does it have led lights to indicate such as if 'all is okay' or 'ground open' etc. like its there on other spike protectors. Please let me know , this can be a deciding factor whether i should consider belkin economy series. Thanks

The belkin 8 Socket Gold have two leds, one for Power & another for Grounded.

As given in my previous post, go through those links.

Economy Series doesn't have any LED indication, apart from Switch ON/Off.
 
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techspark

Broken In
The belkin 8 Socket Gold have two leds, one for Power & another for Grounded

As given in my previous post, go through those links.

Thanks for confirming. Yeah i had a good look at the links . I was considering 8 socket gold series, but i hate the fact that even after spending 1.4k on a surge protector and not having individual sockets. I will never keep all the 8 outlets on at one time.

I think MX looks like the only option with the individual switches. Is there any other better alternative ?

Economy Series doesn't have any LED indication, apart from Switch ON/Off.
Thats really bad, how do we know if it has gone bad. My current pinnacle surge protector is working just fine, but i know i am protection-less because the ground is open. If there werent any led lights i would hv never realized that all my components are on risk of getting fried anytime.
 

Ishu Gupta

Manchester United
but i hate the fact that even after spending 1.4k on a surge protector and not having individual sockets. I will never keep all the 8 outlets on at one time.

What's the difference. The key only opens (or closes) the circuit. Not plugging in in a device will do the same.
 
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techspark

Broken In
What's the difference. The key only opens (or closes) the circuit. Not plugging in in a device will do the same.

Yeah, but i need the flexibility to plug/unplug individual devices at a time. I am going to connect my router, dvr, monitor, printer, cell phone charger etc to the surge protector.

I use my printer occasionally and its foolishness to always keep it on. Same goes for my dvr and router. :)

And if i m not wrong, plugging directly to a switched on socket will lead to spark and eventually have an effect on the component.

So if i need to print a document, i will need to first power down everything, connect the printer and power up everything. Waste of time imho. If i have individual switches, i just first turn off the outlet's switch, plug printer in, turn it on. Thats it. No risk of spark , no need to shut everything off :)
 

Ishu Gupta

Manchester United
AFAIK the sparks are normal and wouldn't do any damage. The powerstrip would have a fuse to prevent damage in the rare cases too.

But I understand what you are looking for (peace of mind). Makes sense. :)
 

westom

Banned
Thats really bad, how do we know if it has gone bad. My current pinnacle surge protector is working just fine, but i know i am protection-less because the ground is open. If there werent any led lights i would hv never realized that all my components are on risk of getting fried anytime.
LED only reports on a type of failure that must never happen to a surge protector. Lights only report that a protector was grossly undersized. Disconnected protector components as fast as possible so that a house fire does not result. Left a surge connected to the adjacent appliances or speakers.

Read numeric spec sheets for that Belkin. Post each numbers that claims protection from that type of surge. No numbers will be posted. That type protector does not claim to protect from any typically destructive surge. It is sold by hearsay and a foolish assumption that surge protector sounds like surge protection.

Take a $4 power strip. Add some ten cent protector parts. Sell it for $7 in a supermarket. Or for $40 or $100 as a brand name protector. Same 2 cm protector parts will somehow stop what three miles of sky could not? Same hundreds of joules will absorb a surge that is hundreds of thousands of joules? At what point do numbers obviously say why you had damage?

Even 100 years ago, properly designed and installed protectors meant even direct lightning strikes caused no damage. Even the protector remains functional. But that means the protector connects hundreds of thousands of joules short (ie 'less than 10 feet') to single point earth ground. That means the protector has as dedicated wire for that low impedance connection to earth. That means hundreds of thousands of joules are not even inside. Not hunting for earth destructively via your speakers.

The well proven solution, for about $1 per protected appliance, comes from more responsible companies including ABB, Siemens, General Electric, Intermatic, Keison, Leviton, and Square D. A Cutler-Hammer solution sells in both Lowes and Home Depot for less than $50.

Protection is always about where energy dissipates. Either energy is inside hunting for earth destructively via appliances. A hunt made easier when the protector is too close to electronics. Or energy dissipates harmlessly outside. Does not even damage a 'whole house' protector.

Your choice. A solution that does not even claim protection in its numeric specs. Or one ‘whole house’ protector using over 100 years of well proven science. Either that protector does not even claim protection in numeric specs. Or it connects low impedance (ie 'less than 10 feet') to single point earth ground. The superior solution also costs tens or 100 times less money. Protection is always about where energy dissipates. Any post that does not discuss energy dissipation is simply hearsay. LED can only report a protector that was always grossly undersized. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground.

And if i m not wrong, plugging directly to a switched on socket will lead to spark and eventually have an effect on the component.

Sparks means house fire. Nothing need be unplugged if using solutions found in any facility that cannot have damage. If you must unplug the printer, then you must unplug the refrigerator, furnace, all clocks, dimmer switches, and the dishwasher.

Your telco disconnects phone service all over town with each approaching thunderstorm? Of course not. Telcos all over the world suffer about 100 surges with each storm. And no damage even to the protector. That means a protector connected short (ie 'less than 10 feet') to single point earth ground. And up to 50 meters (150 feet) from electronics. That separation is important for better protection. So that everything is powered and running without damage during all storms.

Sparking and protector failure are only acceptable where urban myth replaces over 100 years of well proven science. Protection is always about energy absorbed harmlessly outside the building. No surge inside the building.
 
OP
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techspark

Broken In
LED only reports on a type of failure that must never happen to a surge protector. Lights only report that a protector was grossly undersized. Disconnected protector components as fast as possible so that a house fire does not result. Left a surge connected to the adjacent appliances or speakers.

Read numeric spec sheets for that Belkin. Post each numbers that claims protection from that type of surge. No numbers will be posted. That type protector does not claim to protect from any typically destructive surge. It is sold by hearsay and a foolish assumption that surge protector sounds like surge protection.

Take a $4 power strip. Add some ten cent protector parts. Sell it for $7 in a supermarket. Or for $40 or $100 as a brand name protector. Same 2 cm protector parts will somehow stop what three miles of sky could not? Same hundreds of joules will absorb a surge that is hundreds of thousands of joules? At what point do numbers obviously say why you had damage?

Even 100 years ago, properly designed and installed protectors meant even direct lightning strikes caused no damage. Even the protector remains functional. But that means the protector connects hundreds of thousands of joules short (ie 'less than 10 feet') to single point earth ground. That means the protector has as dedicated wire for that low impedance connection to earth. That means hundreds of thousands of joules are not even inside. Not hunting for earth destructively via your speakers.

The well proven solution, for about $1 per protected appliance, comes from more responsible companies including ABB, Siemens, General Electric, Intermatic, Keison, Leviton, and Square D. A Cutler-Hammer solution sells in both Lowes and Home Depot for less than $50.

Protection is always about where energy dissipates. Either energy is inside hunting for earth destructively via appliances. A hunt made easier when the protector is too close to electronics. Or energy dissipates harmlessly outside. Does not even damage a 'whole house' protector.

Your choice. A solution that does not even claim protection in its numeric specs. Or one ‘whole house’ protector using over 100 years of well proven science. Either that protector does not even claim protection in numeric specs. Or it connects low impedance (ie 'less than 10 feet') to single point earth ground. The superior solution also costs tens or 100 times less money. Protection is always about where energy dissipates. Any post that does not discuss energy dissipation is simply hearsay. LED can only report a protector that was always grossly undersized. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground.



Sparks means house fire. Nothing need be unplugged if using solutions found in any facility that cannot have damage. If you must unplug the printer, then you must unplug the refrigerator, furnace, all clocks, dimmer switches, and the dishwasher.

Your telco disconnects phone service all over town with each approaching thunderstorm? Of course not. Telcos all over the world suffer about 100 surges with each storm. And no damage even to the protector. That means a protector connected short (ie 'less than 10 feet') to single point earth ground. And up to 50 meters (150 feet) from electronics. That separation is important for better protection. So that everything is powered and running without damage during all storms.

Sparking and protector failure are only acceptable where urban myth replaces over 100 years of well proven science. Protection is always about energy absorbed harmlessly outside the building. No surge inside the building.

Thank you for a very detailed response and for clarifying the various concepts i wasnt really aware of. Although i did not understand everything to the fullest because of my next to zero knowledge of electronics but i get the basic idea that a properly earthed one home connector is all that will help in preventing any damage the surge may cause. I am not sure if the wiring here is properly grounded, but i have no idea on how to check and what to do if it is not.

But still is it a bad idea to get a surge protector ? (peace of mind ?) . Dont you think its better to have my pc connected to something that says it will protect instead of just having it plugged directly to a wall outlet. ? Doesn't the fuse and MOV's help in some kind of protection that a wall outlet wont?

Please let me know your thaughts. Excuse me for my limted knowledge. Thanks
 

westom

Banned
Although i did not understand everything to the fullest because of my next to zero knowledge of electronics but i get the basic idea that a properly earthed one home connector is all that will help in preventing any damage the surge may cause. I am not sure if the wiring here is properly grounded, but i have no idea on how to check and what to do if it is not.
If wiring inside a house is relevant, then the surge is inside. Once inside, a surge goes hunting for earth destructively via appliances. Nothing inside a house does protection. Nothing. Interior wiring is irrelevant to protection.

If you comprehend any article in a first reading, then it was mostly about things you already knew. The above post only contains layman concepts. Requires zero electronics knowledge. Those simple concepts so new that one must reread it at least three times. It’s not complex - just new.

If your PC is plugged into a surge protector, then it connects to something that does not claim any effective protection. And can sometimes make surge damage easier. I cannot be blunter about this. This was not grasped if you only read it once:
Read numeric spec sheets for that Belkin. Post each numbers that claims protection from that type of surge. No numbers will be posted.
If that Belkin did protection, then you posted those numbers. It was not a rhetorical a question. It was a demand for facts. Go get those Belkin spec numbers now. Don’t take my word for it. Read Belkin’s numbers that define protection. Posted was a request for you to act - what is necessary to have damning questions. Stop reading. Get those numbers.

Protection is always about where energy dissipates. That concept was critical. Anyone who recommends protection must always say where energy dissipates. Belkin does not. Where does surge energy dissipate? If permitted inside, then destructively via appliances. Again, what was posted:
Protection is always about where energy dissipates. Either energy is inside hunting for earth destructively via appliances. A hunt made easier when the protector is too close to electronics. Or energy dissipates harmlessly outside. Does not even damage a 'whole house' protector.
A 'whole house' protector is earthed. Wall receptacles only have a safety ground - not earth ground. The point was made repeatedly with an important number:
But that means the protector connects hundreds of thousands of joules short (ie 'less than 10 feet') to single point earth ground.
You should have plenty of questions. In part because:
The superior solution also costs tens or 100 times less money.
It was not an idle statement.

Most of this may not make any sense until you go to Lowe's et al to touch one. Ask the salesman for a Cutler-Hammer 'whole house' protector. Open its box. Find the dedicated green wire for a short connection to earth. All effective protectors must have that connection.

Then ask for copper clad steel ground rods. No protector does protection. Those rods are where hundreds of thousands of joules dissipate. If you don't touch it, then like me, you have no idea what is posted here.

Some protection systems have no protectors. But every protection system always - as in no exceptions - always has earthing. Not safety ground. Earth ground. Every incoming cable connects to an earth ground via a wire. Or makes that connection via a protector. Don't let others, who are easily deceived by advertising, confuse you. The protector does not do protection. Ten foot ground rods (or something equivalent) do it.

Above only introduces concepts. How a protection system is implemented is best understood only after these basics are understood. Did you know only you are responsible for installation and maintenance of that ground rod - especially for human safety?

Wiring inside a house is irrelevant to surge protection. And as stated previously:
A hunt made easier when the protector is too close to electronics.

The post was written at a layman's reading level. Concepts are so new as to require multiple rereads. Listed were more responsible manufacturers who provide solutions. Belkin was not listed for many good reasons. Reason number one: protection is always about where energy dissipates. How do hundreds of joules in a Belkin magically absorb hundreds of thousands of joules? Two: a protector is only as effective as its earth ground. Why does a Belkin not have an earthing wire and does not even discuss earthing? Damning questions that any layman could and is encouraged to ask. A Belkin may even make damage to an adjacent computer easier. That sentence alone should raise eyebrows and cause more questions.

A protector is only as effective as its earth ground. Therefore every facility that cannot suffer damage, instead, earths a 'whole house' protector. Best protection is distant from electronics and as close to earth ground as possible. Just another reason why computer is best connected directly to a wall receptacle. As stated previously:
That separation is important for better protection.
 

sunnyg78

Right off the assembly line
Its Nail on Head for Belkin. Thanks for explaining basic science and traditional lightining/surge protectors.

But, when coming to the home wiring/ciruiting, we are not sure about the circuting is properly done, though a protector, a single point earth ground ( a copper wire connecting to the ground- burried with charcoal/salt etc ) is in place, already. So, we would request you to provide a circuit diagram for the protection mechanism/installation details.

For others, who are not sure about/cannot implement the protector ( the single point earth groung ), can use Belkin Surge Protectors which protects minor surges ( few hundreds joules ) occurring via power distribution, atleast. But, to face risk on lightining surges !!.

Thanks
Sunil
 

denhot

Broken In
Finally which one is best to buy for 6 to 8 sockets?
I'm using a 6 switch MX for over 4 years now, works like a charm not a single damaged component which was a usual occurrence earlier, save your money don't go for overtly branded products.
 
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