Learn photography with me

ajayritik

Technomancer
Guys I'm not sure if this is the right place but still wanted to check. I have Sony Z1 with great camera features. Can someone suggest some tips to take good pics out of it.
 
OP
nac

nac

Aspiring Novelist
Guys I'm not sure if this is the right place but still wanted to check. I have Sony Z1 with great camera features. Can someone suggest some tips to take good pics out of it.
- Get to know your camera - what it's capable of and what's its limitation.
- Try to mimic the photographs you like
- If you're interested in photography and you're new... check this out...
 

natalie

Banned
Ok so i dont own a 550d. It is a 500d, but anyway, i just did a one day photography course to learn some basics, and it was great, so looking forward to getting out there and using it more
 

izzikio_rage

Technomancer
It's been pretty long since a post here. Will give the head in the street exercise a try today.
[MENTION=74234]natalie[/MENTION]: The 500D is a pretty awesome camera, it'll allow you to do a great many things. Just go out and shoot, post your best stuff in one of these threads and I'm sure you'll find loads of people willing to help you further
 

sujoyp

Grand Master
I even didnt do a one day photography course and used D3100 for 3 long years...that didnt stop me from anything :D still shot 25k pics with that
 

potatoboy

Broken In
Greetings, fellow shutterbugs! This is a small post about how TAKING pictures is the most important part of learning. Now, this topic I think would have been covered already, but I still want to share my experience if that's OK.

I'd picked up my first camera seven years ago. It was a beautiful little Canon Powershot A590IS, the perfect point-and-shoot WITH full manual control. The only teacher I ever had was the internet and myself. For over four years I used this little feller- even managing to get shots of lightning with it by using CHDK on it.I toted the A590IS to contests(and ended up losing), during treks, and pretty much anywhere. That's one of the biggest secrets to learning photography - take your camera wherever you can.
So yes, the learning opportunities are endless with pretty much any camera. Even mobile phones(I once used a Nokia N95 on an entire week trip to Delhi, Agra and Jaipur and came back gloating over the pictures :) )

Happy shooting!

P.S if anyone wants to see any of the pictures, do let me know!
 

izzikio_rage

Technomancer
Yup, agree with every word of what you said, carry cam, take pictures, experiment and have fun. Would love to see the pics
 

potatoboy

Broken In
Thanks for the replies! I've posted the links below. Although most of my uploads go on my personal timeline for friends to see, I update these from time to time.

Here's a Facebook page I made when I was in the buy-DSLR-make-a-page phase(please ignore the name of the page :D ) : https://www.facebook.com/TheUberPhotographer

And here's my Flickr stream : https://www.flickr.com/photos/photoabhi

Do provide any sort of C&C on my work! TIA!

EDIT : here's the link to the album with my N95 : https://photos.google.com/album/AF1QipM3dr8iu0J4blnCLAqaxYDG_cU9feCrcCUQVmIW
 
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krishnandu.sarkar

Simply a DIGITian
Staff member
Hello, I just got D5200 with default 18-55mm kit lens. I have gone through various tutorials for understanding Exposure Triangle. Today I was out for some testing same pic on various settings so that later I can review and get a practical idea. Now I'm stuck with very odd scenario.

Please look at the pics below with EXIF Data.

E2hUVse.jpg


1st : f22 1/60

oCrgzoa.jpg


2nd : f14 1/200

GbXEx6B.jpg


3rd : f9 1/500

PxC4CkS.jpg


4th : f3.5 1/3200

All the pics I have clicked on Aperture Priority Mode. So I set the aperture and camera decides Shutter Speed and ISO.

The problem is, small aperture (large f no) have high exposure and large aperture (small f no) have low exposure. Isn't it should be opposite? Large aperture means it's taking more light then how come it got low exposure instead of high exposure?

I do understand that the shutter speed have been changed by camera. But isn't that to maintain the balanced exposure? If so, then all the pics should have same exposure or with minor details.

But here the scenario is totally opposite. Large aperture images have low exposure and small aperture images have high exposure. How can this be possible?
 

izzikio_rage

Technomancer
Aperture numbers are inverse numbers. So f14 means focal length divided by 14 is the diameter of the aperture opening.

Essentially f/1.4 will have a larger opening than f/14
 

krishnandu.sarkar

Simply a DIGITian
Staff member
Aperture numbers are inverse numbers. So f14 means focal length divided by 14 is the diameter of the aperture opening.

Essentially f/1.4 will have a larger opening than f/14

Yeah. That I know. My question was how come exposure get decreased with large aperture? Whereas it should be opposite?

Nevermind, I got the answer here : aperture - Basic Exposure Query - Photography Stack Exchange

Just thought of sharing if someone wants to know the details.
 

Samarth 619

Modrator @ Xbhp Biking
You see, the larger the focal length (in mm), the lesser light travels to the sensor. Focal length is the length of the "X" formed in the lens of a camera, the crossover.
That means, high optical zoom (><) results in less light reaching to the sensor, than a low zoom (X), provided the aperture is opened equally in both cases.

Aperture is hence, actually a ratio....


So, an opening of exact 50mm diameter in aperture, will bring less exposure at 105mm, then it will bring at 18mm... But this will confuse people.
Because quantitatively exposure opening is the same at 50mm, but exposure caused will be different because of more/less "zoom"...

So, Aperture is a ratio of Focal Length:Iris hole opening.

S0, F/ 4.0 Aperture value can be achieved by:-

50mm zoom: 12.5mm iris opening OR
100mm zoom: 25mm iris opening, OR
200mm zoom: 50mm iris opening. (The more technically correct word for zoom here is "Focal Length", but that might confuse new people.)


A bigger Aperture means smaller values which make the ratio go down. So, f 2.0 (60mm zoom:30mm iris opening) lets in more light compared to f 4.0 (60mm zoom: 15mm iris opening).

A bigger maximum aperture in a lens enables faster shutter speeds for any situation. So,

at f 2.0 you may snap at 1/100th of a second, OR
at f 3.5 you may snap at 1/25th of a second, which is slower and may cause motion blur.


Take it as a tap. Exposure is the water that actually reaches the glass. See the image below to understand:-

iu
 
OP
nac

nac

Aspiring Novelist
I understand the relation between av and tv, but I think the example image is not right.
Let's for the discussion, leave out the aperture here and just concentrate on shutter speed.
I can go upto 1/2500th of a second in my camera. Let's say I capture water flowing out of a tap like in the above picture @ fastest tv, I would get something similar to or close to 1/30th of the sample image in the previous post and if I take the shot @ 15sec exposure, I would get something close to or similar to 1/125th of the sample above. I think the blogger wrongly put the description for the images.
 
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