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sujoyp

Grand Master
[MENTION=125321]nac[/MENTION] its an example of exposure and not related to water photography

it shows at f16 aperture opening is small and exposure will be less so the shutter speed will be slow...and at f8 aperture will be large so more exposure so shutter speed is more.

yaah but in water photography what nac said is correct...at 1/30 it will look more smooth and 1/125 we will see drop by drop of water :)

good explaination samarth
 

Samarth 619

Modrator @ Xbhp Biking
I understand the relation between av and tv, but I think the example image is not right.
Let's for the discussion, leave out the aperture here and just concentrate on shutter speed.
I can go upto 1/2500th of a second in my camera. Let's say I capture water flowing out of a tap like in the above picture @ fastest tv, I would get something similar to or close to 1/30th of the sample image in the previous post and if I take the shot @ 15sec exposure, I would get something close to or similar to 1/125th of the sample above. I think the blogger wrongly put the description for the images.
We're not photographing the water being filled itself. The example image is ok I think. Let me explain in short...
The water is the exposure of a photo.
A filled glass is a properly exposed photo.

1. If the tap is opened little, ie. aperture is smaller, say f/ 16, then water will drop little by little so you will need more time to fill the glass, say 10 seconds. This 10 seconds is shutter speed which is slow right now.

2. If the tap is opened fully, ie. the aperture is wide open, say f/ 4, the glass will fill very quickly, say only 2 seconds or so. This means, shutter speed is faster.

Conclusion? With a wider aperture, your shutter speeds always will be lesser for the same photo (ISO being constant)... Simple! :)


Why is samarth calling himself a newbie.. He certainly knows his stuff
Thanks buddy. :) I know many things, and many things I don't know. Would love to learn more and also, share whatever I know too... And yes, I'm new to the forum itself so I didn't know where I would stand among members who might be much better...

Thanks sujoyp too. :)
 
OP
nac

nac

Aspiring Novelist
1. If the tap is opened little, ie. aperture is smaller, say f/ 16, then water will drop little by little so you will need more time to fill the glass, say 10 seconds. This 10 seconds is shutter speed which is slow right now.

2. If the tap is opened fully, ie. the aperture is wide open, say f/ 4, the glass will fill very quickly, say only 2 seconds or so. This means, shutter speed is faster.
Thanks.
I thought the image was the end result of the exposure, something like this.

Understanding_shutter_speed.jpg


But it didn't strike me that the water actually is the amount of light, and the blogger tried to explained it with that image.

aperture.gif
 
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