BSc Physics vs BE (Electrical+Electronic)

Techguy

In the zone
Got 88% at ISC XII exams, and I'm getting admission at a local college for BE in Electrical&Electronic engineering.

I was wondering whether I should do a BSc in Physics cause there are many engineers, and not too many jobs. It seems to have go saturated. How are prospects after doing a BSc? I'm confused because a BE/BTech student can do a MSc/M.Tech and answer exams to get into PhD/MSc programs, but a BSc is not very useful and requires a MSc.

Should I do a BE or BSc? Many people online say that BE holders are more valuable and have better job oppurtunities.
 

RCuber

The Mighty Unkel!!!
Staff member
[MENTION=120757]Techguy[/MENTION]: what path do you want to take ? often students make mistake of choosing career based on what is available and not what the person wants to do in his life. just because a job is better paying doesn't mean it has job satisfaction. money isn't everything.

the question is .. What do you want to learn?
 
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Techguy

In the zone
I like physics, and electronics in general. I love experimentation, tearing things down & checking how they work. I enjoy reading Physics related topics, so I was considering Electrical+Electronic Engineering; but the field seems to be saturated and will be difficult to work in unless I pass out from a very good college. The alternative is now a BSc in Physics, and many say there is a lot of scope for research; which is why I was asking about it.

If I do engineering it's not because someone told me to, I like related stuff, and am also drawn to Physics, so both of the options are based on my own choice.
 

icebags

Wise Old Owl
if u r very confident with math & physics, can solve difficult calculus & trigonometric stuff without a hitch and can score good in exams in those, then u should sure go for B.Sc -> M.Sc and maybe even higher.

just remember, doing a B.Sc only wont take u much further, and M.Sc or higher degrees in physics are for good studious academics only. if u have that confidence, jump for it, if possible, with integrated M.Sc with some reputed university. our country really needs good academics and researchers.

B.Tech on the other hand, is career centric, if u want to go academic / research lines, then again u must find a way to a reputable university via M.Tech. electronics/electrical B.Tech course offers a lot of physics & maths, as well as computer papers, but again u will end up being somewhere in IT or small core industry or may even become the hammer wielding network guy (engineer :D) at some cellfone or network company, unless u are a math wizard with strong determination to go explore new horizons and capable of proving urself eligible in all competitive exams (a bit of good financial support is always better).

best of luck, choose wise.

p.s.
I like physics, and electronics in general. I love experimentation, tearing things down & checking how they work. I enjoy reading Physics related topics, so I was considering Electrical+Electronic Engineering; but the field seems to be saturated and will be difficult to work in unless I pass out from a very good college. The alternative is now a BSc in Physics, and many say there is a lot of scope for research; which is why I was asking about it.

If I do engineering it's not because someone told me to, I like related stuff, and am also drawn to Physics, so both of the options are based on my own choice.

having only "interest" is not good enough. unless u re very good at math, u wont be scoring good and not good scores don't provide opportunities. a lot of people dont have good scores, but have interest in physics & maths, it is fine as hobby, but there is a career u will need to support ur life first.

B.Tech in electronics / electrical graduates get almost all the opportunities a B.Sc physics guy does get except a few. i think u can even do M.Sc physics at some universities, if u have B.Tech in electronics / electrical, not sure though, u must check urself.
 
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Techguy

In the zone
Yes, once I do a BSc, I will go for a MSc because as you mentioned a simple BSc really can't get you anywhere. Will most probably go for a PhD after that :cool:

What I wanted to know is should I do a BE (Engineering) and then go in for a MSc( or MTech), instead of BSc>MSc, becuase a BE can do a MSc and MTech, but a BSc can only do a MSc.
 

icebags

Wise Old Owl
u didn't get it, >.>

if u can get into some reputed university, and confident about scoring big marks in math & physics, then go for B.Sc.

otherwise B.Tech has more opportunities.
 
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Techguy

In the zone
u didn't get it, >.>

if u can get into some reputed university, and confident about scoring big marks in math & physics, then go for B.Sc.

otherwise B.Tech has more opportunities.

Thanks, but I've got a question:

If I do a B.E in Electronics, can I answer the JAM (Joint Admission Test for Masters) exam for a MSc?
The requirements ask for a Bachelor's degree (with 3 years as Physics as a subject).
 

icebags

Wise Old Owl
Thanks, but I've got a question:

If I do a B.E in Electronics, can I answer the JAM (Joint Admission Test for Masters) exam for a MSc?
The requirements ask for a Bachelor's degree (with 3 years as Physics as a subject).

BE / BTech doesn't have any paper called "Physics" for 3 years. no it's a no i think.
 

icebags

Wise Old Owl
But can a BE/BTech student do a MSc ?

depends on MSc specialization and university, people normally go for Mtech, rather than MSc. here in kolkata, calcutta univ has course of MTech in radio physics & electronics, which is basically hard core radio physics with electronics applications of the same. people who complete that, may apply for phd in radio physics as well i guess.

u need to browse through the available university and their course / eligibility details, if u want to fix a path that way. other wise, to choose just any field of physics, best bet is going for bsc physics, provided u can score good marks.

master degree courses dont always have huge number of seats, at many places its just 5-12 no of students in a course in a year. so expect tough competition.
 
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Techguy

In the zone
depends on MSc specialization and university, people normally go for Mtech, rather than MSc. here in kolkata, calcutta univ has course of MTech in radio physics & electronics, which is basically hard core radio physics with electronics applications of the same. people who complete that, may apply for phd in radio physics as well i guess.

u need to browse through the available university and their course / eligibility details, if u want to fix a path that way. other wise, to choose just any field of physics, best bet is going for bsc physics, provided u can score good marks.

master degree courses dont always have huge number of seats, at many places its just 5-12 no of students in a course in a year. so expect tough competition.

Thinking of the BSc, but doing a MSc + PhD will take comparatively longer.However it should be easier to get in for a MSc compared to a MTech because there are less students right?

Engineering is no issue, but isn't it a bit saturated due to the fact that everybody is doing it and there are engineering colleges all over from which thousands of students graduate? From what I've heard, jobs are scarce and salaries are very low. Advice?
 

icebags

Wise Old Owl
getting in to MSc + PhD should not be taken lightly. few students also means few seats available. ur goal should be doing it from a reputed university.

for getting into MTech, u will have to clear all india GATE exam & again, if u want to go for big, u will have to do it from one of the good IITs/ISI only, which is a bit tougher.

local college Mtech students are normally populated by people who want to be lecturer in colleges or those who did not get job in time.

from what i understand of you now, i will recommend B.Tech, not B.Sc. :wink:
 
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Techguy

In the zone
getting in to MSc + PhD should not be taken lightly. few students also means few seats available. ur goal should be doing it from a reputed university.

for getting into MTech, u will have to clear all india GATE exam & again, if u want to go for big, u will have to do it from one of the good IITs/ISI only, which is a bit tougher.

local college Mtech students are normally populated by people who want to be lecturer in colleges or those who did not get job in time.

from what i understand of you now, i will recommend B.Tech, not B.Sc. :wink:

Gotta decide :cry:
What qualifications does one need to teach at an engineering college? Do they have to be an engineer?
 

icebags

Wise Old Owl
master's degree on the subject to teach a bachelor student.

english, physics, chemistry, math teachers dont need a degree in engg, if the paper is a non engg paper.
 

AcceleratorX

Youngling
Gotta decide :cry:
What qualifications does one need to teach at an engineering college? Do they have to be an engineer?

M.Tech/M.E. in the respective, or related branch of engineering. Ph.D. in relevant branch will be considered as added bonus (but is not required). In specific cases, a Ph.D. in Physics may also teach engineering courses.

icebags said:
english, physics, chemistry, math teachers dont need a degree in engg, if the paper is a non engg paper.

The rules are very illogical in such respects and it's not always clear cut. According to AICTE/UGC rules, for example, I can teach BSc and MSc in Physics/Electronics (only), but I have B.Tech + M.Tech degree and not BSc + MSc. So, suppose I do join any university or college, I will join a Physics department, having never studied BSc or MSc in Physics. While there is no doubt on conceptual clarity, the concepts and methods are in fact different.

Then why does anyone wonder about quality of education in India? :)
 
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