Nokia phone recharges without wires!

Discussion in 'Technology News' started by soumya, Jun 21, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. soumya

    soumya New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2005
    Messages:
    361
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Barasat, Kolkata
    [​IMG]

    Pardon the cliche, but it's one of the holiest of Holy Grails of technology: Wireless power. And while early lab experiments have been able to "beam" electricity a few feet to power a light bulb, the day when our laptops and cell phones can charge without having to plug them in to a wall socket still seems decades in the future.

    Nokia, however, has taken another baby step in that direction with the invention of a cell phone that recharges itself using a unique system: It harvests ambient radio waves from the air, and turns that energy into usable power. Enough, at least, to keep a cell phone from running out of juice.

    While "traditional" (if there is such a thing) wireless power systems are specifically designed with a transmitter and receiver in mind, Nokia's system isn't finicky about where it gets its wireless waves. TV, radio, other mobile phone systems -- all of this stuff just bounces around the air and most of it is wasted, absorbed into the environment or scattered into the ether. Nokia picks up all the bits and pieces of these waves and uses the collected electromagnetic energy to create electrical current, then uses that to recharge the phone's battery. A huge range of frequencies can be utilized by the system (there's no other way, really, as the energy in any given wave is infinitesimal). It's the same idea that Tesla was exploring 100 years ago, just on a tiny scale.

    Mind you, harvesting ambient electromagnetic energy is never going to offer enough electricity to power your whole house or office, but it just might be enough to keep a cell phone alive and kicking. Currently Nokia is able to harvest all of 5 milliwatts from the air; the goal is to increase that to 20 milliwatts in the short term and 50 milliwatts down the line. That wouldn't be enough to keep the phone alive during an active call, but would be enough to slowly recharge the cell phone battery while it's in standby mode, theoretically offering infinite power -- provided you're not stuck deep underground where radio waves can't penetrate.

    Nokia says it hopes to commercialize the technology in three to five years.

    YAHOO!
     
  2. 6x6

    6x6 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2008
    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Normal mobile battery is rated ~1000mAH @3.7V which is 3700mWH energy. Charging it with 5mW source would take > 740hours with 50mW source it would be >74hours
     
  3. Tech.Masti

    Tech.Masti New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2005
    Messages:
    1,516
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    ( 22.2° N, 88.2° E )
    What a idea Nokia'ji !!
     
  4. Dark Core

    Dark Core Freak Beta 1

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Messages:
    219
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Nagercoil
    ^^
    The idea does not belong to Nokia - Wireless charging was first introduced by Palm, Called TouchStone
     
  5. s_arka_r

    s_arka_r New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2004
    Messages:
    71
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    City Of Joy!!!!!!!!!!!
    @Black Core:
    what u r speaking of is the Palm touchstone used in palm pre.
    this is different.
    TouchStone uses inductive technology which charges by just touching the PalmPre's surface.

    while what we r speaking of is charging off the air just lyk dat.
     
  6. azzu

    azzu AJJU

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2006
    Messages:
    2,454
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    hYdErAbAd
    wats this double posting
    ON topic : Nice Idea though it woudnt be enuf
    but it'll make the difference for many hard core mobile users
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page