core i5 review roundup (from benchmark sites)

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  1. desiibond

    desiibond Bond, Desi Bond!

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    By looking at the reviews, core i5 looks to be a serious threat to Nehalem and deadly to Phenom II X4.

    benchmark reviews:


    In nearly all of our benchmarks today, the Intel Core i5-750 outperformed the AMD Phenom II X4 965 and the Intel Core 2 Quad Q9450. In many tests, it even matched the Core i7-920. Needless to say, the BX80605I5750 kit earns top marks in performance.


    Of course, we increased the voltage and took it to the other extreme as well. We were able to overclock our Core i5-750 sample to a bus speed of 180 MHz. That translates to a base clock speed of 3.6 GHz and a maxiumum turbo clock speed of 4.32 GHz.


    source: http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.p...k=view&id=361&Itemid=63&limit=1&limitstart=13


    TweakTown:


    The Core i5 750 is an incredible value and highly overclockable even on air. If the P55 boards are as inexpensive, I can see these flying off the shelves. AMD is going to have to work very hard to recover from this one.


    Source: http://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/29...d_core_i7_870_performance_testing/index9.html


    Techgage:

    Thanks to the Turbo alone, the i5-750 kept near the top of most of our charts, only to be surpassed either by a CPU with a greater raw frequency or by one that had HyperThreading. In our Adobe Lightroom and TMPGEnc Xpress tests, Turbo did enough to keep this lowly $200 CPU ahead of everything else we've tested, aside from the faster Nehalem's of course


    source: http://techgage.com/article/intel_core_i7-870_i5-750_-_nehalem_for_the_mainstream/12


    Hardwarecanucks:


    If you have read this article from beginning to end, our opinion of the Lynnfield processors should be quite evident: two enthusiastic thumbs up! Having said that, we were really dealing with two distinctly different offerings today. On one hand we have the i5-750 that performed extremely well in nearly every single test while not costing an arm and a leg. On the other hand, we have the 750's alter ego; the high-flying i7-870. Both are at their own ends of the Lynnfield spectrum and as such really gave us an interesting take on how things are going to look in Intel's new lineup.


    source: http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/foru...e-i5-750-core-i7-870-processor-review-22.html


    Motherboards:


    Intel has a whole family of products with this launch with new processors, new motherboards to support the processors and a new Platform Controller Hub that changes their entire cost equation. If you want a CPU that offers decent performance without spending the hundreds of dollars a Core i7 920+DDR3 Triple Channel Memory kit+X58 motherboard, the Core i5 750 offers a compelling alternative with slightly lower performance but much lower COO (Cost of Ownership). The Core i7 870, on the other hand offers the same choice for those considering a Core i7 940. A whole slew of motherboards based upon the P55 Express chipset are launching today as well and we have covered some of them for your behalf. Intel did something very interesting this launch, and for those people who want good performance, but have a budget, this is a very nice upgrade path.


    source: http://www.motherboards.org/reviews/hardware/1942_6.html


    Techspot:


    The Core i5 750 is set to launch at $199 and as we anticipated in our review of the Phenom II X4 965, a price cut is in order for AMD to remain competitive. Our benchmarks showed that the Core i5 750 is usually faster than AMD's flagship counterpart.



    No matter which the case, the new Core i5 750 processor along with the P55 chipset is the perfect replacement for the existing Core 2 Quad range, offering enhanced performance at a more affordable price tag.



    source: http://www.techspot.com/review/193-intel-core-i5-750/page11.html


    Hitechlegion:(core i7 870)



    For the price of the processor, the performance was exceptional. It performed all benchmarks with ease and swept just about every category, and the headroom available for overclocking is easily obtainable with some slight voltage modifications and timing changes.


    Tomshardware:

    Alright, so the Core i5-750, specifically, is priced well. What is there to like about it? Reasonable power consumption, a base clock rate comparable to Intel’s Core i7-920, a more-aggressive Turbo Boost able to take the chip to 3.2 GHz in single-threaded workloads, CrossFire and SLI compatibility—it’s a pretty compelling list, actually.


    Of course, this launch isn’t all bad news for the AMD enthusiasts out there. When the Phenom II X4 965 BE debuted in August, I hinted that you should wait until today before taking a leap. Now you see why. With i5-750 selling at $199, AMD has no choice but to compress its price list. At the very least, it’ll likely slash the prices on its high-end Phenom IIs. If you held off, great deals are quite likely in your future.



    Source: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/intel-core-i5,2410-14.html


    Hothardware:


    At $199, the Core i5 750 can easily be considered a hot new mainstream quad-core offering. As our performance data demonstrated, the chip offers a ton of horsepower for its price point. The Core i7 860, which we were unfortunately not able to test also comes in at a palatable $285. Extrapolating the Core i7 860's expected performance based on our Core i7 870 numbers isn't too difficult however, and we're comfortable assuming its performance will be superior to any Core 2 or Phenom II processor--not bad for under 300 bucks. At $555 however, the Core i7 870 is not what you'd consider a mainstream processor, at least in terms of its price entry point. In fact, at that price it's the third most expensive chip in Intel's current desktop CPU line-up. Regardless, it obviously offers very robust processing throughput commensurate with its price tag.


    Source: http://hothardware.com/Articles/Intel-Core-i5-and-i7-Processors-and-P55-Chipset/?page=18


    Tomshardware tests of overclocking core i5-750:


    The Core i5-750 certainly is a great overclocker, but you definitely should set some limits in order to avoid excessive power consumption. Yes, you can get 4.2 GHz performance, similar to many LGA 1366-based platforms with similar overclock settings—but at a much lower price point. Still, we can’t help but posit that conventional, brute-force overclocking might not be such a good idea anymore.
    Intel is in the process of altering what overclocking actually means by changing processor specifications from being guided by clock speed to being defined through the thermal envelope. As long as the processor doesn’t reach specific electrical and thermal thresholds, it’s free to run as fast as possible. This is in fact a model that future processor models from both AMD and Intel could be based on. Core i5 and our overclocking project show that static clock rates don’t count anymore. What matters is the clock range and the thermal/electrical envelope the processor operates within. Future overclocking will likely be guided by modifying that range, rather than by reaching a certain maximum clock speed.
    We can’t say whether or not the P55 platform is the next BX, but we can state that Core i5/i7 on Intel's LGA 1156 interface makes a lot of affordable sense whether you want to overclock it or not.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2009
  2. amitash

    amitash Intel OCer

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    wow...amd pwnt
     
  3. OP
    OP
    desiibond

    desiibond Bond, Desi Bond!

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    yeah dude. this is going to be big trouble for AMD. and look at the cpu speed for i5-750.

    it is at 2.66GHz and this core can go beyond 3.8GHz without sweating. That means Intel can create 10 different core i5 models without doing anything except changing clock speed.

    And by pricing it at 210$ retail, this is going to be a problem for AMD.

    god knows what will happen when Intel launches full range of core i3 and i5 cpus
     
  4. ashu888ashu888

    ashu888ashu888 Core i7 (nehalem) Owner

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    AMD finally faces the Whip... lol.. :D
     
  5. topgear

    topgear Fast 'N' Furious

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    Last edited: Nov 2, 2009
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