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Continuous flickering problem in 3d tv

amir_nandolia

Right off the assembly line
I have been using a Sony 3D TV for about 7 months now and frankly, it is only good for HD viewing. People in my family don’t have any major issues with it but the 3D experience I purchased it for isn’t being served. The constant flicker and discharging of 3D glasses means I have had enough of it. What about passive 3D’s? Is that technology successful?
 

Minion

Conversation Architect
Passive 3D are good they uses light 3D glasses which are comfortable to wear also they don't flicker or use any battery in their glasses lg is using this tech as per my knowledge.
 

randomuser111

Technomancer
The problem isn't the TV but the glasses. Try to get Xpand 3D glasses/Sony TDG-BR750/Sony Playstation 3D glasses to get rid of the issues.
 

vickybat

I am the night...I am...
I have been using a Sony 3D TV for about 7 months now and frankly, it is only good for HD viewing. People in my family don’t have any major issues with it but the 3D experience I purchased it for isn’t being served. The constant flicker and discharging of 3D glasses means I have had enough of it. What about passive 3D’s? Is that technology successful?

Active 3d tv's are prone to flickering due to the active glasses involved. The glasses you wear comprise of lcd's that turn transparent and opague alternatively and thus allowing light from the superimposed 3d images to enter each eye at a time and this has to be done fast. So the alternate change of state from transparent to opague is what causes flickering if the frequencies are not synchronized.

This can be minimized but not completely eradicated. That's why passive displays are gaining popularity as the technology involved is based on polarized light and is devoid of any flickering issues. In future, you'll see lenticular displays too.

Try testing the glasses randomuser111 suggested and see if they minimize flickering.
 

Sam22

TV Expert
The reason behind this is the active glasses that Sony is using in their 3D TVs. When it comes to the glasses used in 3D TVs, There are basically two types, Active and Passive 3d glasses.
 

Kirtu Jindal

Broken In
Passive 3D’s is the evolution of 3D TV’s if you ask me. Unlike active 3D’s, they can be viewed through comfortable polarized glasses and require no connection or charging. Secondly, passive 3D is based on FPR (Film Patterned Retarder) technology, which works on sending images simultaneously to both the eyes. Because of this, you are able to watch flicker free 3D visuals in true quality thanks to the better 2D to 3D conversion ratio. I and a few others in my peer group own the LG Cinema 3D series and we truly enjoy the 3D experience on it.
 

LGWRSherlock

LG Expert
I have been using a Sony 3D TV for about 7 months now and frankly, it is only good for HD viewing. People in my family don’t have any major issues with it but the 3D experience I purchased it for isn’t being served. The constant flicker and discharging of 3D glasses means I have had enough of it. What about passive 3D’s? Is that technology successful?

LG WRman Sherlock here!

Allow me to explain why you are experiencing flickering. As you may already know, the 3D effect is created by showing your left and right eyes different images. Well, the images are almost the same, the only difference is that each image is film/created at a slightly different angle from each other to mimic the space between a person's eyes (which creates our "real world 3D" image). The flickering comes from the glasses of active 3D TVs. Active 3D glasses alternate blacking out each lenses so that at any given moment, only one eye can see anything through the glasses. Essentially, the TV synchronizes with the glasses and shows the "right" image. When the "right" image is shown, the "left" lens blacks out. Then a black screen is shown on the TV followed by the "left" image. Simultaneously, the glasses blacks out the "right" lens. This happens very quickly (typically 120 Hz, so each eye is receiving 60 Hz), to create that 3D effect. The flickering that you experience is the shutter glasses just doing their job.

Not everyone notices the flicker; however, among the people who do, it can be a potentially annoying (and sometimes even hazardous for those with epilepsy) problem. If the flickering really bothers you, I would suggest that you look into the LG World Product line. LG World Record TVs utilize passive 3D, which is a completely different technology from active 3D. With passive 3D, the glasses merely filter out the "left" and "right" images. The glasses are polarized in such a way that only the "right" image shown by the TV enters through the "right" lens -- another way of looking at it is that the "left" image gets filtered out by the "right" lens.

In short, flickering is a problem inherent with active 3D. If the flickering bothers you and you still want to experience 3D at home, I would suggest going for a TV in the LG World Record product line, which is a passive 3D TV -- the same technology used in movie theaters.

I know this a lot of information, but I hope this helps you out! If you want more information about LG World Record TVs, feel free to ask or go to 3D TVs: Discover 3D Televisions | LG India for more information.

LG WRman Sherlock, out!
 

doomgiver

Warframe
i think what he *really* means to say is :

Allow me to explain why you are experiencing flickering. As you may already know, the 3D effect is created by showing your left and right eyes different images.
"current 3D tech is still in the "baby steps" stage, yet we have released it to the general public to milk the full potential of a hype-ridden and broken tech buzzword. hence we havent invested properly in "safe" 3D tech"

Not everyone notices the flicker; however, among the people who do, it can be a potentially annoying (and sometimes even hazardous for those with epilepsy) problem.
"yeah, YOU are the one at fault, you mutant monster, you are ruining this for everyone "

If the flickering really bothers you, I would suggest that you look into the LG World Product line.
"if you want to enjoy watching TV, PAY US. here is a nice, BLOW-A-HOLE-IN-YOUR-POCKET expensive TV for you to watch. till then, lol."

In short, flickering is a problem inherent with active 3D. If the flickering bothers you and you still want to experience 3D at home, I would suggest going for a TV in the LG World Record product line, which is a passive 3D TV -- the same technology used in movie theaters.
[

"in short, im here to make you buy more expensive tv's, PAY ME."
 

LGWRSherlock

LG Expert
i think what he *really* means to say is :


"current 3D tech is still in the "baby steps" stage, yet we have released it to the general public to milk the full potential of a hype-ridden and broken tech buzzword. hence we havent invested properly in "safe" 3D tech"


"yeah, YOU are the one at fault, you mutant monster, you are ruining this for everyone "


"if you want to enjoy watching TV, PAY US. here is a nice, BLOW-A-HOLE-IN-YOUR-POCKET expensive TV for you to watch. till then, lol."

[

"in short, im here to make you buy more expensive tv's, PAY ME."

I'm not sure why you're trying to make fun of me and undermine what I said, but let's try to keep this civil. Everything that I have said in my post about active 3D is a fact. And the suggestion that I made for him to look into the LG World Record product line is genuine, regardless of whether or not I am a representative for LG. The original poster has some issues with active 3D, and I explained to him why he might be having a problem. Then he asked about passive 3D, and I suggested to him a passive 3D TV. I never told him that he MUST buy it, just suggested that he LOOK INTO it. Not even buy it, but for him to take a look himself before making any further decisions.

If you wish to criticize my post, then please do so in a more constructive manner.

LG WRman Sherlock, out!
 

doomgiver

Warframe
making fun of you and undermining your words??!? oh no!!! THE HORROR!!!


i was trying to be CONSTRUCTIVE, you see.... many customers today cannot follow a salesmans' specmanship, so what I try to do is, dumb down the words enough so that the suckers understand it without missing out any of the important points. I think I do a pretty good job, eh?


i take it up with you to prove that you can provide us with a FULL 3D experience without resorting to any sort of tricks or gimmickery like 3D glasses or special hardware. i want a tv that i can turn ON and it'll display 3D images, no messing or fiddling around with glasses or such. do you have such a TV? no? too bad, better get your "3D" tech better, else you are gonna be drowned in legal battles against people who suffered from exposure to childish methods of displaying 3D.


i could rant about how the present methods of displaying 3D are no better than using leeches to let out blood to get rid of a fever, but i digress, you might get offended by that.


as for you point about the "MUST BUY", you arent really giving him a choice in this matter. if he is bothered by flickering, then he MUST buy a super expensive tv, else suffer from "flickering", LOL, AMIRITE?


if you wish to argue with me, then please do so in a logical and "facts-only" manner. HARD FACTS ONLY. NO specmanship.


doomgiver out!
 
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Sam22

TV Expert
making fun of you and undermining your words??!? oh no!!! THE HORROR!!!


i was trying to be CONSTRUCTIVE, you see.... many customers today cannot follow a salesmans' specmanship, so what I try to do is, dumb down the words enough so that the suckers understand it without missing out any of the important points. I think I do a pretty good job, eh?


i take it up with you to prove that you can provide us with a FULL 3D experience without resorting to any sort of tricks or gimmickery like 3D glasses or special hardware. i want a tv that i can turn ON and it'll display 3D images, no messing or fiddling around with glasses or such. do you have such a TV? no? too bad, better get your "3D" tech better, else you are gonna be drowned in legal battles against people who suffered from exposure to childish methods of displaying 3D.


i could rant about how the present methods of displaying 3D are no better than using leeches to let out blood to get rid of a fever, but i digress, you might get offended by that.


as for you point about the "MUST BUY", you arent really giving him a choice in this matter. if he is bothered by flickering, then he MUST buy a super expensive tv, else suffer from "flickering", LOL, AMIRITE?


if you wish to argue with me, then please do so in a logical and "facts-only" manner. HARD FACTS ONLY. NO specmanship.


doomgiver out!

I have to agree with what Sherlock is saying; whether he is representing a company is beside the point. Flickering is a real issue with the active 3D and a big letdown for those who enjoy watching 3D. Though active technology has improved, and the glasses have became lighter but the synchronization between the glasses and the TV is not 100% perfect.

I for one am unable to view 3D in active technology based TV for more than 10-15 minutes at a stretch. Passive technology based 3D are gaining popularity precisely because of this technological deficiency of the active technology variant of the 3D TV. And there are several companies like Toshiba for example that use passive technology and even Sony's 4K TV unveiled at IFA is based on passive technology.
 

randomuser111

Technomancer
^

You should stop talking about flaws that have been addressed since long. 2012 Active 3D sets do not flicker, go and demo yourself. 2011 Active sets had flickering problem yes, but 2012 all sets except the low end ones from Samsung/Panasonic don't have flickering issue.
 

Sam22

TV Expert
I am not so sure about the panasonic one but yeah I have experienced the Samsung 3D TV at GIP(Noida) and there was flickering issues in it. I was unable to watch the 3d content for more than 10 minutes as I start gaining headache.
 

LGWRSherlock

LG Expert
making fun of you and undermining your words??!? oh no!!! THE HORROR!!!


i was trying to be CONSTRUCTIVE, you see.... many customers today cannot follow a salesmans' specmanship, so what I try to do is, dumb down the words enough so that the suckers understand it without missing out any of the important points. I think I do a pretty good job, eh?


i take it up with you to prove that you can provide us with a FULL 3D experience without resorting to any sort of tricks or gimmickery like 3D glasses or special hardware. i want a tv that i can turn ON and it'll display 3D images, no messing or fiddling around with glasses or such. do you have such a TV? no? too bad, better get your "3D" tech better, else you are gonna be drowned in legal battles against people who suffered from exposure to childish methods of displaying 3D.


i could rant about how the present methods of displaying 3D are no better than using leeches to let out blood to get rid of a fever, but i digress, you might get offended by that.


as for you point about the "MUST BUY", you arent really giving him a choice in this matter. if he is bothered by flickering, then he MUST buy a super expensive tv, else suffer from "flickering", LOL, AMIRITE?


if you wish to argue with me, then please do so in a logical and "facts-only" manner. HARD FACTS ONLY. NO specmanship.


doomgiver out!

You seem to be misunderstanding the point of "constructive criticism," but that is besides the point I wish to make. I'm sorry if you feel the way you do, but quite frankly the technology that you are asking for does not exist. Perhaps one day we'll be able to achieve such a quality of 3D, but as of now, the reality is that you only have a choice between active 3D and passive 3D. People who buy 3D TVs pretty much know exactly what they're going to get, as I'm sure they've all watched 3D movies or tinkered with it before purchasing one. If you aren't satisfied with the way 3D technology works currently, then the solution is simple: don't buy it. However, you seem to be going off point from the intention of the original post, which is what I was addressing to begin with. The original poster had a problem with his 3D TV experience and wants a solution to the problem. This implies that he still wants a 3D TV, only one without flickering. Then I gave him a suggestion. That's the end of that. There is no need for disparaging remarks simply because you don't like the way 3D technology works. And even if it is expensive, as you seem to have a major problem with, expense does not seem to be an issue with the original poster, as 1) he already has a 3D TV, and 2) he seems to be ready to replace his current active 3D TV. If he doesn't like the prices, then I'm sure he is intelligent enough not to buy out of his budget.

And no, I am not offended by you. My only hope is that we can simply agree to disagree and move forward from there. Can we at least agree on this?

LG WRman Sherlock, out!
 

doomgiver

Warframe
you seem to misunderstand the point of my posts.


i know current 3D technology sucks, and im not dumb enough to fall into your specmanship trap, unlike some poor sodden folks, who have no idea what they are getting into. i dont see a single board in showrooms telling the NEGATIVE aspects of 3D, like potential headaches, insomnia and even seizures. where did you pull out that "People who buy 3D TVs pretty much know exactly what they're going to get, as I'm sure they've all watched 3D movies or tinkered with it before purchasing one" factoid?

ofc, the OP has no other choice than to replace his tv with a more expensive one!!! and he doest even mind!!! hell, he has enough money that, if you asked nicely, he would even replace the small portable tv in his potty with a huge 55 inch 3D behemoth!!! double the fun for everyone involved, and the tv company gets to laugh all the way to the bank.


anyhow, i dont think i want to argue over semantics, so you can just do what you want to.
 

LGWRSherlock

LG Expert
you seem to misunderstand the point of my posts.


i know current 3D technology sucks, and im not dumb enough to fall into your specmanship trap, unlike some poor sodden folks, who have no idea what they are getting into. i dont see a single board in showrooms telling the NEGATIVE aspects of 3D, like potential headaches, insomnia and even seizures. where did you pull out that "People who buy 3D TVs pretty much know exactly what they're going to get, as I'm sure they've all watched 3D movies or tinkered with it before purchasing one" factoid?

ofc, the OP has no other choice than to replace his tv with a more expensive one!!! and he doest even mind!!! hell, he has enough money that, if you asked nicely, he would even replace the small portable tv in his potty with a huge 55 inch 3D behemoth!!! double the fun for everyone involved, and the tv company gets to laugh all the way to the bank.


anyhow, i dont think i want to argue over semantics, so you can just do what you want to.

You seem to have a misunderstanding of some of the facts. Allow me to explain: Yes, 3D can give you headaches and seizures (I have never, ever heard of someone getting insomnia from watching 3D TVs). However, that is limited to active 3D TVs. Generally speaking, people with photosensitive epilepsy can get seizures when they are exposed to flashing lights. People especially susceptible to such seizures can even get them from looking at a flickering neon light! That is why companies who promote their active 3D TVs issue health warnings about their active 3D sets because rapid flickering is required to create the 3D effect. And due to the way passive 3D works, it's simply not possible for passive 3D to cause seizures. These are facts.

And yes, I would say that the average buyer, if they're going to buy a 3D TV, would know what the kind of 3D effect that they will be getting when they purchase one. As you said, 3D TVs can be quite expensive, so I'm sure that people will check out the 3D for themselves, whether at a store or with a friend's 3D TV, before making the final purchase. No one would expect the type of 3D that you were describing earlier, as that technology doesn't exist.

And just out of curiosity, there are so many other threads in this forum about people purchasing 3D TVs -- why do you only target this one if you are so passionate about trying to get people to refrain from buying one? I just want to have some fun and meet new people on this forum!

LG WRman Sherlock, out!
 

Ankit Omar

Broken In
Try changing the glasses, as already suggested - hope that will solve the problem. And also accept that the 3D TV is just a normal TV - that has an additional feature that enables you watching 3D as and when the fancy strikes you - which would mean an occasional 3D viewing. And anyway, for the sake of your own health - you should not watch 3D for extended period of time - even TV makers suggest a break after 30 to 60 minutes of 3D TV watching - whether you are watching on a passive or an active 3D TV. Also, remember that individual responses may vary in 3D viewing - some people cannot enjoy it much because their bodies are simply not geared for it. So, it may just be you - and not the 3D TV.
 
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