Intel Skylake Core i5 and Core i7 details leaked

Cyberghost

Federal Agent Area 51
Staff member
Intel Skylake Core i5 and Core i7 details leaked

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According to Chinese website Benchlife, images and performance figures of Intel's upcoming Skylake CPUs have leaked. The site says that the Skylake i7-6700K will improve performance by approximately 15 percent over Intel's current Haswell i7-4790K. As Overclock3D points out, 10-15 percent is a pretty standard year-over-year improvement for Intel since the introduction of Sandy Bridge in 2011.

The line of Skylake i5s and i7s features 10 SKUs, ranging from the power-efficient 35W T series chips to the high-performance 95W K series. The latter is obviously what we're excited about. Skylake represents the "tock" in Intel's tick-tock processor release cycle, and the 95 watt TDP (as opposed to 88 watts for Haswell) coupled with a more efficient architecture will hopefully allow for some serious overclocking.

The Core i5 and Core i7 Skylake CPUs shown in BenchLife's leak support both DDR3 and DDR4 memory. Core i3 processors are expected to release later. Check out the table below, via Benchlife, for the full CPU lineup.

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We still don't know exactly when Skylake will be hitting. For some unverified (but realistic-looking) early benchmarks of the chips,head over to Overclock3D.

Source: PCgamer
 

saswat23

Human Spambot
DDR3L is DDR3 Low Voltage.
DDR4 consumes 1.2V so just to be in the same league, DDR3L may have been added just to reduce the investment cost. DDR4s would of course cost a bomb when released.
Perhaps older DDR3 (1.5V) might run as well.
 
Skylake can support both, mainstream DDR3 and DDR4. It all depends on the board/OEM manufacturer to pick one of from these two or opt for uniDIMM. The bigger problem here is yields. We still don't have quad core mobile broadwells, or desktop ones too on that matter. 14nm is proving much difficult for Intel, and unlike Samsung Exynos, the silicon area is much larger, and hence binning process is kind of difficult.

Imagine a person buying recently launched Alienware in August with Broadwell quadcore, and in August he/she sees Skylake hitting shelves. Agh, what a sight it will be.
 
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