What's the difference between Watching 1080p videos on 1080p & 720p Monitor???

Discussion in 'Hardware Q&A' started by emmarbee, Jul 22, 2009.

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  1. emmarbee

    emmarbee New Member

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    Hi,

    QUERY:
    Long had been my doubt on this subject (since last year, When I had been looking for mera pehla LCD) and still haven't got clarified.

    Of course, the first thing that comes to your mind in replying to this thread is 1:1 Pixel mapping. But what exactly is the difference in 1:1 pixel mapping and scaling?

    THEORY:

    1:1 pixel mapping allows us to see every pixel in detail.
    If the scaling is upward (upscaling), then the quality might be degraded, as the pixels are zoomed and the clarity won't be good and it is noticeable.

    EXAMPLE: DVD Video of resolution 720×480 (NTSC) or 720×576 (PAL) when viewed on a monitor with 1680x1050 resolution in full screen mode - the pixels are scaled to 1680 wide 1050 height making the video look more blurry (in common language - pixelated).
    Thus upscaling reduces the image quality for SURE!

    But when a 1280x720 viewed on a 800x600/1024x768 monitor or 1920x1080 video watched on a 1680x1050 monitor, the video is down scaled to their respective resolution making the video more sharper.

    Then why the hell are we longing (including me) for a 1080p monitor???

    Okay, even if someone proves (YET TO) that 1080p video viewing is better in a 1080p monitor, I've got another solution.

    In media player classic - there is an option called "Video Frame - normal, Half Size, Double Size, Touch Window From Inside and Touch Window From outside"
    If we select normal mode in video frame option of MPC - it won't scale the video but it will display in 1:1 PIXEL MAPPING.
    So if we select FULL SCREEN option and select the "normal" video frame mode for a dvd resolution video in a 720p monitor, It will display the video in 1:1 pixel mapping and rest of the space it'll display BLACK BARS.

    And the same thing for 1080p video too! If we select "normal" in "video Frame" mode for a 1080p video in 720p monitor, it will display the video in 1:1 pixel ratio there by cutting some video area(who cares about that few cut out area of a movie) and 1080p IN ITS FULL GLORY IN A 720p MONITOR!

    Any comments on this blabbering is welcome!

    AXIOMS:
    1) The resolution of 1680x1050 of Dell 2209WA can't be considered as a disadvantage as far as video viewing is considered.
    2) Whereas, for gaming - YES there will be PURE DIFFERENCE as the rendering itself is just 1680x1050 but in a 24" it will be 1920x1080 OR 1920x1200. SO the detailing will be more. But then, YOUR VGA CARD MUST BE ABLE TO HANDLE THAT RESOLUTION AND ENABLE OTHER EYE CANDIES LIKE AA,AF etc., (IMHO, a lower resolution game with AA,AF turned on is FAR BETTER THAN higher resolution game with AA,AF turned off - any comments?)
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2009
  2. max_demon

    max_demon IM AS MAD AS HELL!!

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    ^^I personally feel High res game with aa,af turned off look better ,

    also the quality is degraded when we downscale the image , yea it becomes sharper , but too sharp for the image to display good .

    1:1 pixel scaling is good as monitors native resoultion is concerned
     
  3. OP
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    emmarbee

    emmarbee New Member

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    When I said, a lower resolution game - I meant the game being played on a smaller monitor with lesser resolution and not on a big monitor that supports bigger resolution.
    Even I do feel that playing a game with lesser resolution than your monitor supports looks like crap.

    1440x900 resolution gaming looks crap on 24" monitor but not on 19" monitor :)
     
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