Things I found after disassembling my TV

cute.bandar

Cyborg Agent
I opened up my old 40" videocon TV that had broken last year. My idea was to try and repair it.

About : Most 'Led' Tvs are LCD TV backlit with LED lights. True LED I think are only OLED, where each pixel is an LED.

Parts of a LCD/LED TV:
1. Power supply board - Power Cord goes here. Convert AC to DC, supply different voltages etc. Sometimes there is a separate invertor board to supply power to the LED lights.
3. MainBoard - Has all the ports, processing signal etc. Has various connections to buttons, and IR receiver for remote.
4. TCON board - Signal goes from mainboard to TCON . Don't really know what this does.
5. LCD layer - From TCON there are 2-6 'ribbon' like cables that go 'into' the LCD layer. These ribbons are basically circuits. FYI there is a small chip on these circuits.

Between the LED lights and LCD there are various sheets to diffuse/spread and filter the led light.
Shit picture:
k63L1PO.jpg


The point: I googled model numbers of components. The power board, mainboard and TCON board are all generic chinese components! Found on aliexpress. LCD layer would probably be generic as well. So this TV is no different from buying an 'assembled' TV from olx. Maybe most cheap TV's are merely assembled. Maybe not a surprise for most of you.. but I bought Videocon thinking 'Indian' brand, not generic chinese. Which in hindsight was silly.
 
Last edited:

Cool Buddy

Wise Old Owl
There are hardly any manufacturing facilities actually manufacturing modern electronics components in India. Most of the "Indian" brands are selling cheap Chinese products. Most of the international brands are selling high quality Chinese products. If an electronics product says "Made in India", understand it as "all components imported from China and assembled inside a possibly Indian made body/enclosure".

The much touted world's largest mobile phone manufacturing unit setup by Samsung in Noida is also just an assembly plant. This article sheds some light on this issue: World’s Largest Mobile Factory, Yes, but India Is Importing More Electronics Than Ever
Only about 6% of the components of all electronics sold in India are truly indigenously manufactured.

The Nokia phone I bought last year was marked Made in India. But some preliminary research showed that Nokia had sourced most of the components from its factory in Vietnam.
 

billubakra

Conversation Architect
Make in India thing isn't doing anything good for the country. As mentioned above, If an electronics product says "Made in India", understand it as "all components imported from China and assembled inside a possibly Indian made body/enclosure". This make in India initiative stopped Tesla from coming to India about a year and a half back.
 

SaiyanGoku

kamehameha!!
As long as India remains stuck with its ancient labour laws,all manufacturing will go to countries like Vietnam.
Cost of setting up a new semiconductor fab is extremely high and nobody wants to do that in India because of politics. Multiple Indian billionaires can do it but they won't get return for a considerable amount of time (compared to their current businesses).
 

billubakra

Conversation Architect
Cost of setting up a new semiconductor fab is extremely high and nobody wants to do that in India because of politics. Multiple Indian billionaires can do it but they won't get return for a considerable amount of time (compared to their current businesses).
Ambani can do it and get the ROI within 2-4 years, but I guess he's doesn't want to do that as of now.
 

whitestar_999

Super Moderator
Staff member
Ambani can do it and get the ROI within 2-4 years, but I guess he's doesn't want to do that as of now.
No he won't. M Ambani is a good businessman & knows the stupidity of Indian labour laws & infrastructure hurdles.Petroleum/refining business is different as it does not need a large formal workforce(to whom labour laws apply to) as most of the things are automated & only need supervision from few engineers & for rest of the small tasks informal/contract labour is there(which is not so much covered by labour laws).
 

billubakra

Conversation Architect
No he won't. M Ambani is a good businessman & knows the stupidity of Indian labour laws & infrastructure hurdles.Petroleum/refining business is different as it does not need a large formal workforce(to whom labour laws apply to) as most of the things are automated & only need supervision from few engineers & for rest of the small tasks informal/contract labour is there(which is not so much covered by labour laws).
That is why I said that he "can" do it par mota bhai ko kahi aur se $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ a rahe hai.
 

Desmond

Destroy Erase Improve
Staff member
Admin
Can someone ELI5 what is the problem with labour laws here? Also, which are the exact laws in question?
 

Cool Buddy

Wise Old Owl
Ambani is a businessman, not a philanthropist. He will make decisions which seem profitable to him.

India has created an environment where businessmen do not want to take large scale risks. Ambani entered telecom because it was easy. There was already an established market, he just had to acquire customers by undercutting the competition. Manufacturing chips or LCDs might not be as easy. The customers in such cases will be other businesses who will want a long term sustainable business model and can't be wooed by discounts.

Why would any company switch to Reliance for their requirements? They won't. Reliance will have to put in a lot of effort to create any market for its product. At low volumes, they will obviously not be able to match the prices of Chinese manufacturers. So they'll have to sell at losses and wait for 8-10 years to earn returns on their investments.

India does not have a friendly environment for setting up large scale manufacturing projects. Which is why India lags behind other countries in the first place. You say Ambani can? I say he can't. He has the money to set up the plant, but he won't be able to turn a profit on it. No one in India has any expertise to do that.
 

whitestar_999

Super Moderator
Staff member
Can someone ELI5 what is the problem with labour laws here? Also, which are the exact laws in question?
5 contentious issues holding up India's labour law reforms
Former Niti Aayog chairman Arvind Panagariya best captured the complexities of India's labour laws in these words, "The labour situation is incredibly complicated: when you go from six workers to seven in a firm, the Trade Unions Act kicks in. When you go from nine to ten, the Factories Act kicks in. And when you go from 19 to 20, something else kicks in, as happens again when you go from 49 to 50 and 99 to 100. The biggest killer is the Industrial Disputes Act, which says that if you are a manufacturing firm with 100 workers or more, you cannot dismiss any of them under any circumstances unless you get prior approval from the government."

"This is rarely given and it applies even if you go bankrupt, in which case you still have to pay your workers. This has important consequences because investors are not going to enter into an industry if they can't exit. So India has a very pernicious set of labour laws and that really, to me, is the reason why Indian firms have remained so small on average

P.S. Labour laws in India only apply to formal labour so companies prefer to hire contract workers or informal labour(the kind which does the most work in any building construction work you usually see).
 

icebags

Wise Old Owl
it's not that there is no chip manufacturing facilities in india. there are, but they are mostly for specialized govt use and not available to public.well, BELL sells consumer grade electronics parts to open market, so does some more other parts manufacturing companies, but they are not actually high tech semiconductor stuff.

consumer grade chip factory/labs are expensive to set up and need continuous and stable supply of resources and materials. and thanks to communist govt, china is the no.1 candidate to ensure all these at the cheapest cost.
these days even in west they don't have much consumer level chip building facilities for the same reason. first world countries do all those designing, managing and outsource the hardware job to china taiwan etc.

india has a few assembling facilities, where huge technical expertise is not really a requirement. as wells as there are some chip designing farms, which do the software part and the designing.

for your time pass with factory tours:


more:

 
Last edited:
Top Bottom