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Learning Java

Hey everybody, I wanna learn Java from scratch. I found some Ebooks on the net-
Learn Java/Java 6/Java 7 etc in 21 days(all are different books)
Should I start the Java 7(latest book), or is their some hierarchy?
I mean, do I have to read the previous versions? i.e. Is Java 7 different from Java 6 n so on?
Is it OK to start the Java 7 book?
Thanks.
 

krishnandu.sarkar

Simply a DIGITian
Staff member
No. You don't need to learn Java 6 to learn Java 7 neither you need to do that.

Things are almost identical, with performance and other security fixed. Syntax doesn't change much.
 

rhitwick

Democracy is a myth
Dude, my advice would be this,
Buy "The Complete Reference : JAVA" by "Herbert Schildt" and read from preface to chapter 10 (Threading if that is its still organized)

Read each word and practice every damn program.
 

Desmond

Destroy Erase Improve
Staff member
Admin
It is ok to start from the Java 7 book but also have a reference book handy to know what's been deprecated in Java 7 so that you avoid using those methods.

You don't need to learn Java 6 or 5 unless you are working on something that needs to be backwards compatible.
 

vickybat

I am the night...I am...
New boston is great, especially bucky roberts.

But the java tutorials, although good are a bit dull compared to his other tutorials.
But they are highly informative and concise nonetheless.
 

deadcode00

Broken In
Actually i like the way he explain things .. Its easy to understand.. Very good for newbie .. I also followed his tutorials and thats really helped me to understand java..
 

vickybat

I am the night...I am...
Actually i like the way he explain things .. Its easy to understand.. Very good for newbie .. I also followed his tutorials and thats really helped me to understand java..

Actually i meant something else. See, i've followed his xhtml, html5, javascript and mysql tutorials and finished them too. In all of these, he cracks humorous jokes in between to lighten up the mood, and his tone is light and jovial. The funniest way to learn some serious subjects and that too by practical viewing.

But in the java tutorials,he sounds serious and rarely cracks a joke, almost through all the chapters. Its not like he's half hearted and all , but maybe java is a more serious and hardcore topic. :))
 

kg11sgbg

Indian Railways - The Vibrant and Moving INDIA
Another great site is Udacity.(Link :---> www.udacity.com)
In there,hands on practical goes side by side with learning.
A very good modular approach.
OP could also try for that,though newboston is GREAT.
 

vickybat

I am the night...I am...
Another great site is Udacity.(Link :---> www.udacity.com)
In there,hands on practical goes side by side with learning.
A very good modular approach.
OP could also try for that,though newboston is GREAT.

+1 for Udacity. I almost forgot to mention this.

Dude, my advice would be this,
Buy "The Complete Reference : JAVA" by "Herbert Schildt" and read from preface to chapter 10 (Threading if that is its still organized)

Read each word and practice every damn program.

Buddy, complete reference series is not for learning from scratch. Its a reference book.
Guys who are familiar with java syntax and methods will benefit from it. For complete newbies, there are better options like head first java and the above mentioned tutorials.
 
Last edited:

deadcode00

Broken In
+1 for Udacity. I almost forgot to mention this.



Buddy, complete reference series is not for learning from scratch. Its a reference book.
Guys who are familiar with java syntax and methods will benefit from it. For complete newbies, there are better options like head first java and the above mentioned tutorials.

+1 for head first java...
 

rhitwick

Democracy is a myth
Buddy, complete reference series is not for learning from scratch. Its a reference book.
Guys who are familiar with java syntax and methods will benefit from it. For complete newbies, there are better options like head first java and the above mentioned tutorials.
When I was in college I taught myself JAVA by that book. Yes, it helps if you have programming background but its obviously a good book. Don't ignore it because it has "Reference" in its name.
 
OP
A

abhisheknaik96

Broken In
Yeah, another thing...
I just downloaded and installed JDK 7 from the Oracle website. Now which application in which folder of that should I open to make Java programs? There is a 'java' application in the 'bin' folder, but when I open it, a DOS-like environmentopens for a second n then closes.
Please help.
Thanks.
 

deadcode00

Broken In
Yeah, another thing...
I just downloaded and installed JDK 7 from the Oracle website. Now which application in which folder of that should I open to make Java programs? There is a 'java' application in the 'bin' folder, but when I open it, a DOS-like environmentopens for a second n then closes.
Please help.
Thanks.

Why dont you try eclipse.. Download and install it, and start programming
 
Yeah, another thing...
I just downloaded and installed JDK 7 from the Oracle website. Now which application in which folder of that should I open to make Java programs? There is a 'java' application in the 'bin' folder, but when I open it, a DOS-like environmentopens for a second n then closes.
Please help.
Thanks.

You cannot develop Java apps with JDK alone, you also need an IDE. NetBeans is the most popular IDE for Java (and is developed by Oracle themselves). Download it, install it and you'll be redy to develop Java applications on it. There are step-by-step instructions available on Oracle's website on getting started with netbeans.
 

Desmond

Destroy Erase Improve
Staff member
Admin
It is not necessary to have an IDE to code in Java. You can do it in notepad as well. And I recommend that you start out with notepad so that you understand how the compilation process takes place. Once you understand this, then move on to using IDEs.
 
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