Alternative career options for IT Professionals

soorajdigit

Journeyman
I am 29 years old & currently working as an Android app developer for more than 3 years. I am not so much passionate about it. I learnt it then because I have basic Java knowledge & so thought it would be easy to learn compared to others. But many unexpected problems are there here like device specific issues, client pressures, issues from 3rd party libraries (I have heard that even classes provided by Google itself have issues), no idea to develop advanced UIs functionalities.

Now I had lost interest in my field of work & just working to prevent being unemployed for income.

What are the alternate career options for me for a tension free work?
 

Desmond

Destroy Erase Improve
Staff member
Admin
tension free work
I don't think there is any IT career where you will not have tension. I am 31 and working ~9 years in software development/IT and I have worked on good projects and abysmally worst projects.

IMO generally "tension-free" is a function of management more than anything else and a little bit on your personal skill and disposition as well.

Failures in management such as underestimating the efforts required when promising delivery to clients or lack of addressing dependencies on efforts, etc adds debt that will cause problems later for everyone. In a chain of command, upper management will pressurize supervisors and team leads to deliver and they will put pressure on developers under them which can result in longer working hours or rework. The pressure you have is actually not as much as the pressure your supervisors experience. In such cases, I'd personally speak with the supervisor about the work pressure (if they seem approachable) otherwise best switch to another employer. Note that you don't owe the company anything and that you deserve a good working environment as well.

As for technical challenges, it's more of getting used to the idiosyncrasies of the tools/libraries. As frustrating as it may seem, your skill and experience using them is still valuable and knowing when to use them is what gives value to your career. But it's okay to be bored of them as well, in such a case I'd suggest taking up some different skill that you can also use. For example, if you already know Android development, try to learn how to create a REST-ful web service that you can consume from an Android app or learn something like Ionic or Cordova to build apps using web technologies. Just take up course from sites like Udemy and learn it in your spare time. While you can take up anything I would not recommend taking up some skill very different from your core competency because such a skill would not help your career.
 
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rhitwick

Democracy is a myth
I am 29 years old & currently working as an Android app developer for more than 3 years. I am not so much passionate about it. I learnt it then because I have basic Java knowledge & so thought it would be easy to learn compared to others. But many unexpected problems are there here like device specific issues, client pressures, issues from 3rd party libraries (I have heard that even classes provided by Google itself have issues), no idea to develop advanced UIs functionalities.

Now I had lost interest in my field of work & just working to prevent being unemployed for income.

What are the alternate career options for me for a tension free work?
There is no tension free work anywhere.

If your work is not giving you challenges (or tension) then you are doing some mundane work.

Also, switching career midway may not help you. Why don't you work on this?
"no idea to develop advanced UIs functionalities"

You've recognized a gap there, why not enhance this?!
 

Anorion

Sith Lord
Staff member
Admin
advertising, marketing, PR, journalism... these fields are easy to get into if you have the necessary skills, and many of the people working here come from very diverse academic backgrounds, not necessarily directly related to the profession. But the background helps, for example an app developer in a PR firm with apps as clients has an advantage over those who cannot code.
 

pkkumarcool

Game & anime Lover
@Desmond David would you suggest learning web development technologies like React or Angular and can it be implemented in android apps Is it similar to REST ful web service?
 

Desmond

Destroy Erase Improve
Staff member
Admin
@Desmond David would you suggest learning web development technologies like React or Angular
Yes. But note that Google is planning on deprecating Angular. So it's best to go with React right now for front end development. Another good framework is Vue.js
and can it be implemented in android apps Is it similar to REST ful web service?
I didn't understand your question. Angular/React, etc are front end frameworks and they are not related to RESTful web services. But if you mean developing android apps using Angular or React then yes, you can do that. Look up Apache Cordova or Ionic Framework. These will create what we call hybrid apps.
 

pkkumarcool

Game & anime Lover
Yes. But note that Google is planning on deprecating Angular. So it's best to go with React right now for front end development. Another good framework is Vue.js

I didn't understand your question. Angular/React, etc are front end frameworks and they are not related to RESTful web services. But if you mean developing android apps using Angular or React then yes, you can do that. Look up Apache Cordova or Ionic Framework. These will create what we call hybrid apps.
i mean i see a trend in recent android apps based on web services like mostly when you open such android app they are like web pages and web pages can be based on react.
 

Desmond

Destroy Erase Improve
Staff member
Admin
I think he meant those web wrappers that are just web view of mobile website, but apps.
There are two kinds of this. Progressive web app is where you can create a shortcut from your browser and the shortcut acts as an app in itself. The second type are hybrid apps which is what you (and I think @pkkumarcool ) are referring to, which is a native app that basically runs a web-view that renders the app.
 
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quicky008

Technomancer
try appearing in UPSC/PSC exams for government jobs-some of them have an upper age limit of upto 40.If you are lucky,you just might make it and then you will never have to worry about your work again.
 
OP
S

soorajdigit

Journeyman
There is no tension free work anywhere.

If your work is not giving you challenges (or tension) then you are doing some mundane work.

Also, switching career midway may not help you. Why don't you work on this?
"no idea to develop advanced UIs functionalities"

You've recognized a gap there, why not enhance this?!
but if a work is always tensionful?
 
OP
S

soorajdigit

Journeyman
There are two kinds of this. Progressive web app is where you can create a shortcut from your browser and the shortcut acts as an app in itself. The second type are hybrid apps which is what you (and I think @pkkumarcool ) are referring to, which is a native app that basically runs a web-view that renders the app.
When I add PWA to home screen (e.g. flipkart, amazon), it shows in app drawer & applications list. But when I add some web pages (e.g. hotstar) to home screen, it shows only in home page but still opens like a seperate app like PWA. What is the difference here?
 
OP
S

soorajdigit

Journeyman
I don't think there is any IT career where you will not have tension. I am 31 and working ~9 years in software development/IT and I have worked on good projects and abysmally worst projects.

IMO generally "tension-free" is a function of management more than anything else and a little bit on your personal skill and disposition as well.

Failures in management such as underestimating the efforts required when promising delivery to clients or lack of addressing dependencies on efforts, etc adds debt that will cause problems later for everyone. In a chain of command, upper management will pressurize supervisors and team leads to deliver and they will put pressure on developers under them which can result in longer working hours or rework. The pressure you have is actually not as much as the pressure your supervisors experience. In such cases, I'd personally speak with the supervisor about the work pressure (if they seem approachable) otherwise best switch to another employer. Note that you don't owe the company anything and that you deserve a good working environment as well.

As for technical challenges, it's more of getting used to the idiosyncrasies of the tools/libraries. As frustrating as it may seem, your skill and experience using them is still valuable and knowing when to use them is what gives value to your career. But it's okay to be bored of them as well, in such a case I'd suggest taking up some different skill that you can also use. For example, if you already know Android development, try to learn how to create a REST-ful web service that you can consume from an Android app or learn something like Ionic or Cordova to build apps using web technologies. Just take up course from sites like Udemy and learn it in your spare time. While you can take up anything I would not recommend taking up some skill very different from your core competency because such a skill would not help your career.
Basically it feels like a trap
 

Desmond

Destroy Erase Improve
Staff member
Admin
When I add PWA to home screen (e.g. flipkart, amazon), it shows in app drawer & applications list. But when I add some web pages (e.g. hotstar) to home screen, it shows only in home page but still opens like a seperate app like PWA. What is the difference here?
I have not developed PWA or web applications before, so I am not sure about the exact differences. But I think it might be the way the PWA is implemented in the web page. Not all websites implement the PWA code.
Basically it feels like a trap
How do you mean?
 
OP
S

soorajdigit

Journeyman
I have not developed PWA or web applications before, so I am not sure about the exact differences. But I think it might be the way the PWA is implemented in the web page. Not all websites implement the PWA code.

How do you mean?
Because I have no experience in other programming platforms. In my opinion IT industry especially software development is not friendly for learn & develop considering the demanding client pressures. There are clients who demand the projects to be delivered within the given amount of time & companies despite knowing that it is not practically possible, agree with them. Regarding app development, since the app is the end product, it is the app developers who are questioned 1st & we have to make sure it is not the mistake is not in app side.

Sent from my Redmi Note 9 Pro using Tapatalk
 

Desmond

Destroy Erase Improve
Staff member
Admin
Because I have no experience in other programming platforms.
I'd suggest learning on your own time. Enroll for some course on sites like Coursera, Udacity or Udemy.
In my opinion IT industry especially software development is not friendly for learn & develop considering the demanding client pressures.
That really depends on your company. Many companies organize training drives.

You can also ask your manager to arrange for training for yourself or your colleagues. You can justify by saying that this will benefit not only yourself but also the company because you can use the skills to implement solutions. If they don't agree, then better learn on your own. If you think that the work is too pressurizing, you should consider switching to another company. You might still want to brush up on your skills if you want to attend an interview for another company.

There are clients who demand the projects to be delivered within the given amount of time & companies despite knowing that it is not practically possible, agree with them.
This is again a management issue. If your manager is a "yes man" to the clients, then speak to his manager or give feedback to HR. Note that you don't owe any loyalty to the company and you don't have to work like a slave. But then again, this is usually the work of a team lead, not a manager. A team lead would analyze the client's requirement and flatly say if it's not possible in the timeframe or what's the dependencies of the requirement. If they don't agree, then it's the team lead's responsibility to push back. Since you said earlier that you don't have a team lead, then I guess it's up to you: Either push back against their requirements with sensible justification. It's better to speak up than accept a task that you won't be able to deliver, with sensible justification. In private with your manager if possible.

Regarding app development, since the app is the end product, it is the app developers who are questioned 1st & we have to make sure it is not the mistake is not in app side.
So, how is your team organized? Who leads your team? I have never seen a company where individual developers are held responsible for the whole application's functionality. There is always a team lead or product owner who is responsible for the deliverables. The product owner is someone who's job is to know the functional aspects of the project and to understand the client's expectation and requirement. The product owner passes down the requirements to one or more team leads (depending on the subdomains of the project) and the team leads will then break the requirements into smaller tasks and assign each task to the team members. As such the product owner and the team lead are the first ones to get chewed up if the deliverables don't meet expectations.

If upper management is speaking to your directly, then either you are screwed up really bad or your management is kind of in shambles.

In any case, if you feel like the pressure is too much or you don't like the work culture of your company, consider switching to another company. But note that depending upon the years of experience, the expectations of your future employers will also be higher. You just need to brush up your skills and attend as many interviews as possible.
 
OP
S

soorajdigit

Journeyman
I'd suggest learning on your own time. Enroll for some course on sites like Coursera, Udacity or Udemy.

That really depends on your company. Many companies organize training drives.

You can also ask your manager to arrange for training for yourself or your colleagues. You can justify by saying that this will benefit not only yourself but also the company because you can use the skills to implement solutions. If they don't agree, then better learn on your own. If you think that the work is too pressurizing, you should consider switching to another company. You might still want to brush up on your skills if you want to attend an interview for another company.


This is again a management issue. If your manager is a "yes man" to the clients, then speak to his manager or give feedback to HR. Note that you don't owe any loyalty to the company and you don't have to work like a slave. But then again, this is usually the work of a team lead, not a manager. A team lead would analyze the client's requirement and flatly say if it's not possible in the timeframe or what's the dependencies of the requirement. If they don't agree, then it's the team lead's responsibility to push back. Since you said earlier that you don't have a team lead, then I guess it's up to you: Either push back against their requirements with sensible justification. It's better to speak up than accept a task that you won't be able to deliver, with sensible justification. In private with your manager if possible.


So, how is your team organized? Who leads your team? I have never seen a company where individual developers are held responsible for the whole application's functionality. There is always a team lead or product owner who is responsible for the deliverables. The product owner is someone who's job is to know the functional aspects of the project and to understand the client's expectation and requirement. The product owner passes down the requirements to one or more team leads (depending on the subdomains of the project) and the team leads will then break the requirements into smaller tasks and assign each task to the team members. As such the product owner and the team lead are the first ones to get chewed up if the deliverables don't meet expectations.

If upper management is speaking to your directly, then either you are screwed up really bad or your management is kind of in shambles.

In any case, if you feel like the pressure is too much or you don't like the work culture of your company, consider switching to another company. But note that depending upon the years of experience, the expectations of your future employers will also be higher. You just need to brush up your skills and attend as many interviews as possible.
is doing things faster before is always the measure of skills in improvement? no right? Another thing regarding Android Development. Our code behaves 100 ways on 100 devices.

Consider the case of showing an Alert Dialog when a button is pressed or text change which calls an API when certain number of characters entered. It isn't mentioned anywhere in doc (as far as I know) that there may be any delay in launching an alert dialog, during this gap, pressing the button or typing the text rapidly can launching the dialog multiple times. Similar issue exists in Google Drive when you click the 3 vertical dots which opens the file options bottom sheet menu. I am working on company's own product. So client & employer is the same. Imagine the condition of developers when the app is tested like this. So we are expected to handle the faults in SDK also
 

Desmond

Destroy Erase Improve
Staff member
Admin
is doing things faster before is always the measure of skills in improvement? no right? Another thing regarding Android Development. Our code behaves 100 ways on 100 devices.

Consider the case of showing an Alert Dialog when a button is pressed or text change which calls an API when certain number of characters entered. It isn't mentioned anywhere in doc (as far as I know) that there may be any delay in launching an alert dialog, during this gap, pressing the button or typing the text rapidly can launching the dialog multiple times. Similar issue exists in Google Drive when you click the 3 vertical dots which opens the file options bottom sheet menu. I am working on company's own product. So client & employer is the same. Imagine the condition of developers when the app is tested like this. So we are expected to handle the faults in SDK also
That looks like an idiosyncrasy of your domain of work (mobile development). In such a case you should look up what is the standard practice. I don't think this is an issue unique to you, this seems like a common scenario in all mobile development companies.

Similarly if you encounter faults in the SDK, then I am sure it will not only affect you. Everyone who is developing using that SDK will face your problems sooner or later and perhaps some more experienced developers might already have some working solution (or workaround). So check up sites like StackOverflow and feel free to ask questions if you don't find an answer specific to what you are looking for.
 
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