Suggest a robust voltage stabilizer for computers.

quicky008

Technomancer
I live in a rural area which experiences frequent voltage fluctuations,especially during the monsoons-the voltage sags and swells so often that my old 650 va APC ups has a hard time keeping up with it and frequently switches to battery.

So i was wondering whether it would be a good idea to connect my UPS to a voltage stabilizer that could supply a steady 220-230V at all times?It would cause reduced stress on the ups whenever the line voltage is fluctuating a lot and consequently ,prevent it from switching to battery often.Also most stabilizers are capable of working with a wider voltage range as compared to an UPS,which can only handle voltage related anomalies to a limited extent.

While searching on amazon,i came across some voltage stabilizers that are intended for use with refrigerators and feature something called time delay system to protect the connected equipment-while this may be useful for home appliances, i think it would be a disadvantage for computers as it would prevent the system from receiving power instantly when power is restored after a blackout.

So please recommend a stabilizer that would be suitable for my requirements and can stabilize low and high voltage to safe levels(~230V).As i already have an ups,i dont really want to spend too much on it-my budget is around 2.5k at most.

Also,i usually keep two of my pcs connected to my ups and when both of them are operational,they tend to draw around 150-270W(depending on load),so the stabilizer should be able to handle it without any issues.
 
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quicky008

quicky008

Technomancer
Not particularly fond of vguard but as the market is practically saturated with their products there doesn't seem to be much of a choice here.

Do you have any particular model(s) in mind?
 

whitestar_999

Super Moderator
Staff member
Not particularly fond of vguard but as the market is practically saturated with their products there doesn't seem to be much of a choice here.

Do you have any particular model(s) in mind?
Nothing particular but some members here from South are happy with their products.
 
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quicky008

quicky008

Technomancer
In that case if anyone has used a good stabilizer for their computers,please specify its make and model here.
 
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quicky008

quicky008

Technomancer
how can i calculate the wattage a stabilizer is equipped to handle from its Amp rating? If a stabilizer has a capacity of 1.3A,how much watts can it actually supply without tripping or malfunctioning?
 
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ico

Super Moderator
Staff member
I haven't used one. Back in the day my inverter used to kick in if there was low voltage. And, I had a computer UPS on top of it.
 

whitestar_999

Super Moderator
Staff member
how can i calculate the wattage a stabilizer is equipped to handle from its Amp rating? If a stabilizer has a capacity of 1.3A,how much watts can it actually supply without tripping or malfunctioning?
To get the maximum power - Multiply "230 x Max rated Current" of all the equipment that are to be connected to the stabilizer. Add a 20-25% safety margin to arrive at stabilizer rating. If you have plans to add more devices later, you can keep buffer for them.
In case the Voltage Stabilizer has a rating in watts also, assume a power factor of 0.8 (W=V*A*pf).
The most important thing is to know the nature of the load connected to the stabilizer. First you must note down the power (or Watts) for all the appliances that will be connected to a stabilizer. The sum total of the power consumption (or Watts) will give you the load on the stabilizer in watts. But most stabilizer sizes are in VA (Volt Ampere) or kVA (kilo Volt Ampere which is equal to 1000 Volt Ampere). Although to get the actual VA (or Volt Ampere) from Watts (W) you will have to do some measurements, but to give a rough approximation, you can increase the Watts value by 20% to get the approximate VA size that you may need.
 
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quicky008

quicky008

Technomancer
What is the power factor of a typical pc? If i assume it to be 0.8, then will i have to consider the double of that no ie 1.6 when factoring in the load of 2 pcs?
 

whitestar_999

Super Moderator
Staff member
What is the power factor of a typical pc? If i assume it to be 0.8, then will i have to consider the double of that no ie 1.6 when factoring in the load of 2 pcs?
PF doesn't work like that & PF is for AC(not air conditioner but alternating current) aka for ups,inverter etc which supply AC in absence of mains power supply(which is also AC) & not your typical home appliances.
 
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quicky008

quicky008

Technomancer
i was thinking of buying this stabilizer(vguard mini crystal supreme):



its rated for 1.3A, 230V. So if the PF is assumed to be 0.8,its power output capacity will be around 240W,right?

Will 240W suffice for 2 computers,if they are used together at the same time?Can this stabilizer handle such a load?
 

whitestar_999

Super Moderator
Staff member
its rated for 1.3A, 230V. So if the PF is assumed to be 0.8,its power output capacity will be around 240W,right?

Will 240W suffice for 2 computers,if they are used together at the same time?Can this stabilizer handle such a load?
As per formula on v-guard site, it should be ~240W.

What are the 2 pc configs though chances are very low unless they are pretty old/weak configs?
 
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