Windows partition in Ubuntu

Discussion in 'Open Source' started by zegulas, Sep 12, 2006.

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  1. zegulas

    zegulas Traceur

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    Hi, I have live Ubuntu CD. I wanted to play some songs and movies which are on my 'D:' drive, but I could not find any way to find or mount that partition in Ubuntu. Plz help.
     
  2. cpyder

    cpyder CpyderGraphix

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    Launch gparted from System-Administration
    Check linux name for your D: drive. Most probably it would be listed as hda3. If not note whatever is the name and also the file system format.

    Launch terminal from Applications-Accesories-Terminal
    Run following commands for FAT32 partitions

    sudo mkdir /media/windows/hda3
    sudo mount /dev/hda3 /media/windows/hda3/ -t vfat -o iocharset=utf8,umask=000

    For NTFS

    sudo mkdir /media/windows/hda3
    sudo mount /dev/hda3 /media/windows/hda3/ -t ntfs -o nls=utf8,umask=0222

    These commands will mount the drive in /media/windows/hda3 folder. Open the folder and have access to all your files.

    Notes: You wont have write/delete access to NTFS partitions.
    Replace <hda3> with the required drive name
    If you are using the live CD, this procedure has to be repeated every time you log on. Anyone who knows how to avoid this may please educate us.
     
  3. JGuru

    JGuru Well-Known Member

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    @Cpyder, Instead of hda3 make it as win_d, win_e etc.,

    $ sudo mkdir /media/win_d

    Now mount the FAT/NTFS partition there

    For NTFS read/write in Ubuntu 6.06 (Dapper Drake) You must install these packages:

    $ sudo apt-get install libfuse2 fuse-utils

    Now add fuse to the list of modules to load

    $ echo fuse | sudo tee -a /etc/modules

    Now create a user group to access the NTFS partition

    $ sudo addgroup ntfs

    The output would look like this:
    Adding group 'ntfs' (1002)...

    Note down the GID ( the number printed after the group name) it may differ, we need
    it later

    $ sudo mkdir /media/win_c

    $ gksudo gedit /etc/fstab

    Append the following line at the end of the file, using the GID previously noted down.

    Code:
    [b]
    /dev/hda1  /media/win_c    ntfs-fuse     auto,gid=1002,umask=0002       0         0
    
    [/b]

    Now save the file.
    Add users to the ntfs group , where 'username' is the name of the user you would
    like to have write access.

    $ sudo adduser username ntfs

    Reboot your PC now for the changes to take effect.
     
  4. cpyder

    cpyder CpyderGraphix

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    Thanx for your suggestions JGuru, yep using names like win_c etc will surely help recognising where are you poke around :) . I dont remember installing those utilities for NTFS read/write. So I think NTFS read access is available by default in Dapper Drake. Write access for NTFS is not provided and various forums say that though write access is available using some utilities, it is still buggy hence i am keeping off-- for now :)
     
  5. JGuru

    JGuru Well-Known Member

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    @Cpyder, These NTFS access (read/write) utilities are tested & works well. I can't say
    very surely that they are without bugs!! You can create a FAT32 Windows partition
    & access that from Linux (read/write).
     
  6. Desi-Tek.com

    Desi-Tek.com New Member

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    ubuntu provide great tool to access windows partition. u son't need to fire any command. Run the Ubuntu Disks Manager. From the system menu bar, choose System | Administration | Disks. In the Disks Manager, find the Hard Disk icon that represents your Windows drive. It is usually /dev/hda. You may see other Hard Disks that you don’t recognize, these are virtual devices created by the LiveCD.
    [​IMG]
     
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