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Water + Nanoelectronics = Super Density stoage Devices

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We all know that you should never mix water and electronics but researchers have demonstrated that a little water can help create ultra-dense storage systems for computers and electronics.

A team of experimentalists and theorists at the University of Pennsylvania, Drexel University and Harvard University have found a new way to effectively store large amounts of data . They have found a way of controlling ferroelectricity in nanostructures by terminating their surfaces with fragments of water. with this new tetchnology they are able to do this:

"Though a scheme for the dense arrangement and addressing of these nanowires remains to be developed, such an approach would enable a storage density of more than 100,000 terabits per cubic centimeter. If this memory density can be realized commercially, a device the size of an iPod nano could hold enough MP3 music to play for 300,000 years without repeating a song or enough DVD quality video to play movies for 10,000 years without repetition."

Full story: http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/article.php?id=956
 

mihirvashist

Journeyman
dharmeshhtailor said:
We all know that you should never mix water and electronics but researchers have demonstrated that a little water can help create ultra-dense storage systems for computers and electronics.

A team of experimentalists and theorists at the University of Pennsylvania, Drexel University and Harvard University have found a new way to effectively store large amounts of data . They have found a way of controlling ferroelectricity in nanostructures by terminating their surfaces with fragments of water. with this new tetchnology they are able to do this:

"Though a scheme for the dense arrangement and addressing of these nanowires remains to be developed, such an approach would enable a storage density of more than 100,000 terabits per cubic centimeter. If this memory density can be realized commercially, a device the size of an iPod nano could hold enough MP3 music to play for 300,000 years without repeating a song or enough DVD quality video to play movies for 10,000 years without repetition."

Full story: http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/article.php?id=956
this was good one and i would like to hear more about it
 
this was coolest dude
i will want u 2 give us such type of precious knowledge.
i ll b eager 2 have more bout it as i m n electronics engg. student
 
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