suse linux os 10.01

Discussion in 'Open Source' started by jacques, Oct 14, 2006.

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  1. jacques

    jacques New Member

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    Hi All,
    Again facing some problem, just installed suse 10.1.
    I have only read access either i logged in as root or i logged in as user. How can i change my permission.
    I am just able to make folder in home folder only. If i make or copy to another drive it denies.

    Please help me out.....
     
  2. mediator

    mediator New Member

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    I presume u wanna copy files to windows partition(drive) ! Neways whateva partition it be will follow same procedure
    steps
    1. open file "/etc/fstab" as root!
    2. look for entries like "/dev/hdc2 /mnt/win_partition_name"
    3. where it reads auto,exec etc append "user" to it

    after appending ur drive entry shud look something like :

    /dev/hdc2 /mnt/songs_vids vfat exec,user,noauto 0 0


    4. Thats it!

    If u have trouble, then post the content of /etc/fstab of ur suse here!
     
  3. drsethi

    drsethi New Member

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    If above does not work then add rw and umask=0000 also
     
  4. JGuru

    JGuru Well-Known Member

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    @Jacques, Post the output of the file '/etc/fstab' here.
     
  5. DukeNukem

    DukeNukem Come get Some

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    If the partitioning is performed by YaST and other partitions are detected in the system,
    these partitions are also entered in the file /etc/fstab to enable easy access to this
    data. This file contains all partitions in the system with their properties, such as the file
    system, mount point, and user permissions.

    Example 2.1 /etc/fstab: Partition Data
    /dev/sda1 /data1 auto noauto,user 0 0
    /dev/sda5 /data2 auto noauto,user 0 0
    /dev/sda6 /data3 auto noauto,user 0 0

    The partitions, regardless of whether they are Linux or FAT partitions, are specified
    with the options noauto and user. This allows any user to mount or unmount these
    partitions as needed. For security reasons, YaST does not automatically enter the exec
    option here, which is needed for executing programs from the location. However, to
    run programs from there, you can enter this option manually. This measure is necessary
    if you encounter system messages such as bad interpreter or Permission denied.


    Source : Suse Start up Documentation (visit suse site for this)
     
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