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Official Windows 10 Thread: Installation and Issues (check first post)

kg11sgbg

Indian Railways - The Vibrant and Moving INDIA
So, it was Dust or incorrect placement of modules.
Dust. Just had to brush it off. As for RAM modules, each of the 4RAM sticks is from CORSAIR with the same frequency /latency configuration.
Based on details available so far, you should be fine. Try it.
Yeah, Friend...Windows 10 Pro(64-bit) installed flawlessly. HDDs were in GPT format.
So Both of my Desktop-PC'are running flawlessly with Windows 10(Pro/64bit).

Again, Thank You all.
 

kg11sgbg

Indian Railways - The Vibrant and Moving INDIA
Sorry @sling-shot , after installing mini tools partition wizard, I found that HDDs were converted to MBR while installing Windows 10 by the Gigabyte GA-78LMT-S2 R2 (HYBRID UEFI) motherboard.

You can't set up BIOS onto UEFI mode or lay partition as GPT for HDD's.

Inside BIOS you've 3 options (modes) for Booting:--->
UEFI
AUTO
NON-UEFI

Even choosing EFI as default boot,the BIOS is still LEGACY!!! No UEFI mode!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

THE MOST SHITTIEST OF MOTHERBOARD BY GIGABYTE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Friend, @whitestar_999 any new ideas?
 

patkim

Cyborg Agent
Gigabyte introduced Hybrid-EFI firmware in their boards a decade ago when UEFI was not that mainstream. It’s main selling point was ability to boot off 2 TB which is limitation of MBR.

To force the firmware to behave like EFI you need to set this switch to EFI (Which you already did) and might need to manually initialize the disk (< 2TB) to GPT before installing Windows using say DISKPART. Then your Windows 64-bit OS (Windows 7 or above) should install in EFI mode with GPT partition scheme on the HDD. The firmware still remains more or less traditional BIOS with a sort small functionality of EFI introduced in it.

I had one such board and I had done extensive testing using this mode in EFI mode. Back then it was Windows 7 64 and it warned me that the BIOS may not supporting booting to this disk, I still continued and it worked with EFI & GPT actually.

Despite being Hybrid-EFI, it had basic coverage of UEFI. You could even boot to EFI Shell externally using pen drive.

One limitation on Hybrid EFI was there were no UEFI variables. There weren’t UEFI boot entries unlike full-fledged UEFI systems. You had traditional Boot menu pointing to SATA HDD1, HDD2 etc and when set to EFI, firmware was designed to just go ahead and look for Bootx64.efi at /EFI/boot folder on EFI partition, without being aware of anything else. All Windows versions capable of UEFI booting have that fallback mechanism anyways.

The firmware is deigned to switch EFI when it detects > 2 TB HDD. Else it might fall back to BIOS by default.

Also, these boards were designed back in 2010-11 when Windows 7 was mainstream, so results with Windows 10 may not be predictable, while the UEFI booting is still the same. You may need to experiment.

To test if you are actually booting in EFI or not when switch is set to EFI, try the following

Download UEFI 64 bit shell from this link edk2/Shell.efi at UDK2018 · tianocore/edk2

Rename it as Bootx64.efi. Format a pen drive to FAT32. Create /EFI/Boot folder on it and place this Bootx64.efi therein inside Boot folder. Now disconnect the HDD and see if it can boot to UEFI Shell from this pen drive. If it does, you are in fact in EFI mode.

Mouse driver is possible in UEFI but optional. Click BIOS (Again BIOS being a misnomer used by Motherboard manufactures!) is a selling point, not a must to have underlying Firmware confirm to the UEFI Specifications. With Hybrid EFI the only focus was ability to boot off > 2TB so only bare minimum EFI specs were confirmed to.
 

RumbaMon19

Feel Pain.
Gigabyte introduced Hybrid-EFI firmware in their boards a decade ago when UEFI was not that mainstream. It’s main selling point was ability to boot off 2 TB which is limitation of MBR.

To force the firmware to behave like EFI you need to set this switch to EFI (Which you already did) and might need to manually initialize the disk (< 2TB) to GPT before installing Windows using say DISKPART. Then your Windows 64-bit OS (Windows 7 or above) should install in EFI mode with GPT partition scheme on the HDD. The firmware still remains more or less traditional BIOS with a sort small functionality of EFI introduced in it.

I had one such board and I had done extensive testing using this mode in EFI mode. Back then it was Windows 7 64 and it warned me that the BIOS may not supporting booting to this disk, I still continued and it worked with EFI & GPT actually.

Despite being Hybrid-EFI, it had basic coverage of UEFI. You could even boot to EFI Shell externally using pen drive.

One limitation on Hybrid EFI was there were no UEFI variables. There weren’t UEFI boot entries unlike full-fledged UEFI systems. You had traditional Boot menu pointing to SATA HDD1, HDD2 etc and when set to EFI, firmware was designed to just go ahead and look for Bootx64.efi at /EFI/boot folder on EFI partition, without being aware of anything else. All Windows versions capable of UEFI booting have that fallback mechanism anyways.

The firmware is deigned to switch EFI when it detects > 2 TB HDD. Else it might fall back to BIOS by default.

Also, these boards were designed back in 2010-11 when Windows 7 was mainstream, so results with Windows 10 may not be predictable, while the UEFI booting is still the same. You may need to experiment.

To test if you are actually booting in EFI or not when switch is set to EFI, try the following

Download UEFI 64 bit shell from this link edk2/Shell.efi at UDK2018 · tianocore/edk2

Rename it as Bootx64.efi. Format a pen drive to FAT32. Create /EFI/Boot folder on it and place this Bootx64.efi therein inside Boot folder. Now disconnect the HDD and see if it can boot to UEFI Shell from this pen drive. If it does, you are in fact in EFI mode.

Mouse driver is possible in UEFI but optional. Click BIOS (Again BIOS being a misnomer used by Motherboard manufactures!) is a selling point, not a must to have underlying Firmware confirm to the UEFI Specifications. With Hybrid EFI the only focus was ability to boot off > 2TB so only bare minimum EFI specs were confirmed to.

can you tell more about uefi shell and its uses? I too have it on my lappy but on clicking it says boot device not found. how to use shell and what can i change through it?
 

kg11sgbg

Indian Railways - The Vibrant and Moving INDIA
Gigabyte introduced Hybrid-EFI firmware in their boards a decade ago when UEFI was not that mainstream. It’s main selling point was ability to boot off 2 TB which is limitation of MBR.

To force the firmware to behave like EFI you need to set this switch to EFI (Which you already did) and might need to manually initialize the disk (< 2TB) to GPT before installing Windows using say DISKPART. Then your Windows 64-bit OS (Windows 7 or above) should install in EFI mode with GPT partition scheme on the HDD. The firmware still remains more or less traditional BIOS with a sort small functionality of EFI introduced in it.

I had one such board and I had done extensive testing using this mode in EFI mode. Back then it was Windows 7 64 and it warned me that the BIOS may not supporting booting to this disk, I still continued and it worked with EFI & GPT actually.

Despite being Hybrid-EFI, it had basic coverage of UEFI. You could even boot to EFI Shell externally using pen drive.

One limitation on Hybrid EFI was there were no UEFI variables. There weren’t UEFI boot entries unlike full-fledged UEFI systems. You had traditional Boot menu pointing to SATA HDD1, HDD2 etc and when set to EFI, firmware was designed to just go ahead and look for Bootx64.efi at /EFI/boot folder on EFI partition, without being aware of anything else. All Windows versions capable of UEFI booting have that fallback mechanism anyways.

The firmware is deigned to switch EFI when it detects > 2 TB HDD. Else it might fall back to BIOS by default.

Also, these boards were designed back in 2010-11 when Windows 7 was mainstream, so results with Windows 10 may not be predictable, while the UEFI booting is still the same. You may need to experiment.

To test if you are actually booting in EFI or not when switch is set to EFI, try the following

Download UEFI 64 bit shell from this link edk2/Shell.efi at UDK2018 · tianocore/edk2

Rename it as Bootx64.efi. Format a pen drive to FAT32. Create /EFI/Boot folder on it and place this Bootx64.efi therein inside Boot folder. Now disconnect the HDD and see if it can boot to UEFI Shell from this pen drive. If it does, you are in fact in EFI mode.

Mouse driver is possible in UEFI but optional. Click BIOS (Again BIOS being a misnomer used by Motherboard manufactures!) is a selling point, not a must to have underlying Firmware confirm to the UEFI Specifications. With Hybrid EFI the only focus was ability to boot off > 2TB so only bare minimum EFI specs were confirmed to.
Very extensive and exhaustive comment with a proper diligent explanation.
Buddy my two WD(Western Digital) 1TB each HDD were in GPT mode and fully blank.
But when I installed Win 10 through pen drive,and later on checking,it was found that the HDDs were changed to MBR mode .
I had enabled EFI mode in BIOS prior to installation.
 

patkim

Cyborg Agent
In that case your Firmware is blind enough to only really switch to EFI when it detects HDD > 2TB. That was the main purpose of Hybrid-EFI. I assume you used Rufus to create a pen drive and forced Rufus to go for only GPT-UEFI booting not including legacy.
In my case it worked at least with Windows 7 64 even with 80GB HDD!
You may still want to check booting Shell method mentioned above to just confirm if it’s really booting in EFI or not. If it does not, then it may be the same constraint of presence of 2 TB HDD applies.


@RumbaMon19

I certainly shall, however may be post Diwali holidays! In the meantime, you will gather a lot of info on the net. Just to briefly comment, your UEFI Firmware does not seem to have built-in shell, some do have others simply don’t. In that case you can externally boot to it using pen drive method or place shell.efi on EFI partition and create a boot entry to it in your UEFI boot order.
 

kg11sgbg

Indian Railways - The Vibrant and Moving INDIA
In that case your Firmware is blind enough to only really switch to EFI when it detects HDD > 2TB. That was the main purpose of Hybrid-EFI. I assume you used Rufus to create a pen drive and forced Rufus to go for only GPT-UEFI booting not including legacy.
In my case it worked at least with Windows 7 64 even with 80GB HDD!
You may still want to check booting Shell method mentioned above to just confirm if it’s really booting in EFI or not. If it does not, then it may be the same constraint of presence of 2 TB HDD applies.


@RumbaMon19

I certainly shall, however may be post Diwali holidays! In the meantime, you will gather a lot of info on the net. Just to briefly comment, your UEFI Firmware does not seem to have built-in shell, some do have others simply don’t. In that case you can externally boot to it using pen drive method or place shell.efi on EFI partition and create a boot entry to it in your UEFI boot order.
Yeah,the pen drive I had created for Windows 10 installation was definitely through Rufus,BUT IN LEGACY MODE!!!!

Through minitools partition wizard I changed the pendrive to GPT mode and booted up PC taking in account the pendrive as the first boot drive.
Boot was successful,but post Boot check screen,where the windows screen of the install pendrive is to appear,there is only a blinking cursor,blinking indefinitely..........
 

patkim

Cyborg Agent
You should set Rufus to create a UEFI boot capable Pen drive not Legacy, if Legacy it shall boot to Legacy mode. The EFI switch has a very very limited functionality. It's not a full UEFI supported system.
I suggest you also try the shell.efi renamed as Bootx64.efi at /EFI/Boot folder on FAT formatted pen drive (The pen drive may be MBR or GPT, that does not matter here)
If it boots to UEFI Shell, your mobo does support UEFI booting. That should be the first check I believe. Also I hope you are connecting only one HDD at the time of install. That's a safer bet.
 
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kg11sgbg

Indian Railways - The Vibrant and Moving INDIA
You should set Rufus to create a UEFI boot capable Pen drive not Legacy, if Legacy it shall boot to Legacy mode. The EFI switch has a very very limited functionality. It's not a full UEFI supported system.
I suggest you also try the shell.efi renamed as Bootx64.efi at /EFI/Boot folder on FAT formatted pen drive (The pen drive may be MBR or GPT, that does not matter here)
If it boots to UEFI Shell, your mobo does support UEFI booting. That should be the first check I believe. Also I hope you are connecting only one HDD at the time of install. That's a safer bet.
Okay as per your suggestions....
But do I need to convert to GPT the HDDs through "DISKPART" program?
In that case existing Windows 10 shall be erased.
 

vidhubhushan

Alakh Niranjan
Then share with us....

i don't remember what was it that i used some 2-3 years back to check but a simple google search throws up many results like these :




 
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